Iowa Learning Farms Webinar: Talking Grazing with Joe Sellers

web3Did you miss our webinar with Joe Sellers, Iowa State University Extension Beef Field Specialist, this week? You’re in luck because we archive all of our webinars on our website!

Tune into the webinar to learn more about:

  • Results from long-term grazing studies on the ISU McNay Research Farm in Chariton
  • How pasture helps store more carbon and organic matter than it loses
  • How to manage grass throughout the growing season and your forage supply year-round
  • How to improve grazing through fertility maintenance and grazing efficiency
  • Why water placement is critical and can help with pasture utilization and manure distribution
  • Resources you can use to learn more, including an updated “Pasture Management Guide,” workshops, the Iowa Forage and Grasslands Conference and more in-depth classes such as the Greenhorn Grazing Class and the Iowa Certified Graziers Class

A few great quotes from Joe:

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“As graziers, we are really managers of plant leaf area and root carbohydrate reserves.”

“Management-intensive grazing is not intensive grazing!”

 

 

 

Tune into the webinar to learn more!

Julie Whitson

October 18 Webinar to Discuss Management-Intensive Grazing and Grasslands

Pasture and forage acres are critical to soil conservation and the profitability of beef cattle operations. Grab your lunch and learn from Joe Sellers, Beef Field Specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. Sellers will discuss practices that improve grazing effectiveness and how management-intensive grazing can work on Iowa farms. He will also discuss where opportunities exist to expand grasslands in Iowa.

DATE: Wednesday, October 18, 2017
TIME: 12:00 noon
HOW TO PARTICIPATE: Log on as a guest shortly before 12:00 p.m.:
https://connect.extension.iastate.edu/ilf/

More information about this webinar is available at our website. If you can’t watch the webinar live, an archived version will be available on our website: https://www.iowalearningfarms.org/page/webinars

Julie Whitson

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Rock Your Watershed! Game Brings an Element of Fun to Nutrient Reduction Strategy Goals

Think you’re smarter than the average 5th grader? Test your knowledge of how land management choices affect the environment and agricultural profits with the Water Rocks! Rock Your Watershed! game, 2.0 version! New and improved, this interactive, online game now offers even more land management choices to players as they design their own agricultural waterfront property.

The Rock Your Watershed! game takes complex issues of nutrient transport, soil erosion, and habitat changes and translates them into an online game where players can see how every choice in land management has both economic and environmental impacts. In essence, it’s like the Nutrient Reduction Strategy in a game!

In the new version, players have the option of adding livestock, urban development, and witnessing how land management choices affect biodiversity.  Using scientific data that correlates how land management choices impact soil erosion, nutrient transport, and wildlife habitat, as well as the impact of precipitation variability, players seek to obtain a high score by achieving an optimal balance between profit, nutrient use, sediment loss, and biodiversity.

new rock your watershed game screen shot

Will you plant row crops right up to the river shoreline? Do you want livestock on part of your land? Will you include a wetland to help filter nutrients? What about including cover crops? Perhaps you will want to include housing or recreational lands. Each choice you make will have an environmental impact as well as a financial cost. You may find yourself wanting to play over and over again in an attempt to beat your previous score. No problem! Revise your previous choices by going back and simply changing one piece of land at a time until you see desired results!

Fun for youth and adults alike, this game can be used to learn about how various land management choices, combined with Mother Nature’s unpredictability, affect both the environment and one’s pocketbook.

Brandy Case Haub

Fly the “W”

blog-header-cubsI love October especially when the Cubs are still playing baseball. Of course as I write this, the series is tied 1-1 and so by the time this is published, the Cubs might not still be playing baseball. But for right now, it is October and the Cubs are in the playoffs and life is good!

Along with postseason baseball, October also brings the fall colors. The other day I was walking through Ames’ largest cemetery and enjoying the beauty of all the trees. Cemeteries are havens of peace and good places to think. My ILF E-News column was due soon and I had no good ideas. I was hoping this walk might shake something loose.

I asked myself, can I tie the Cubs, cemeteries and the Nutrient Reduction Strategy (NRS) together for my column?

cubsgameAs I walked, I noticed a half a dozen graves that were flying the blue “W” near the headstones. For those of you who are not Cubs fans and were in a foreign country last year when they finally won the World Series, the blue “W” represents a Cubs’ win. Now I didn’t check the tombstones for year of death but I am guessing that a few of them died before November of last year and this was the family’s way of acknowledging how important the win would have been for them.

As I walked, I called fellow Cubs fan Jamie Benning and shared with her my observation about the “W” in the cemetery. Did she think I could link the nutrient reduction strategy and Cubs for my column? Jamie suggested exploring if there was anything to learn from the road to the Cubs 2016 World Series victory and the power of a symbol such as the “W” that could apply to NRS implementation.

Of course, we both thought that was a good idea so I went home and gave it some thought. In order for the Cubs to have a chance at a national championship, several things had to happen.

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Most of this work happened in the off-season and most national championships are won by what happens during the periods when the team is not playing ball.

If we want to have greater success in implementing Iowa’s NRS, I think we have some valuable lessons to take from the Cubs’ success.

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It is October. The growing season is over (if you haven’t planted cover crops) and the cash crops are being harvested. The next several months could be considered the “off-season” for those who don’t have livestock. There is a lot of work to do right now to lay the groundwork for greater success in implementing the NRS in the years to come. ‘Cause just like in baseball, next year begins right now.

Jacqueline Comito

retaiN: Putting the Power of Data in the Hands of Farmers

One piece of the puzzle in encouraging farmers to adopt practices that reduce nitrogen loss is to show them how much nitrate is being lost through their tile lines, and if some fields have higher loss than others. Most water monitoring methods are expensive or labor-intensive and it is impractical now to professionally test every farm. We needed to come up with an idea that was effective, inexpensive, and easily done by farmers. The result was the retaiN project.

ILF Juchems 068The seeds for retaiN came from conversations Clare Lindahl and I had with farmers that had participated in tile monitoring. The farmers told us that it was an eye-opening experience. They found that while they were using practices that minimized soil loss and improved soil health, those practices weren’t addressing nitrate loss through their tile.

Afterwards, Clare (at the time Executive Director of Conservation Districts of Iowa) and I were trying to figure out how to make the tile monitoring process easier and accessible to a larger number of farmers. Building on the idea of citizen science, we decided that we could create less expensive testing kits that farmers could use privately on their land to help answer these questions. To get the funds we needed, we applied for and received a grant through the State Soil Conservation Committee.

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Oct_2017_Retain2This seed money enabled us to develop simple kits to make testing tile water for nitrate easy and to also provide farmers with solutions for retaining nitrogen on the farm. In two years, the project has distributed over 1,200 retaiN kits to farmers and landowners individually and through watershed project coordinators, ISU Extension field specialists and county offices, Iowa Corn Growers Association (ICGA) and agribusinesses.

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Oct_2017_Retain1The test kit provides an opportunity to collect on-farm nitrate concentration data and further engages farmers in water quality issues. Participants are encouraged to discuss their results with a specialist but there are no requirements to submit data. A new partnership with Iowa Corn Growers Association saw significant growth this year with ICGA distributing over 400 kits at Crop Fairs, Soil Health Partnership events, and watershed education and outreach events across the state.

The evaluation of the kits from farmers, agribusiness and organization partners, watershed coordinators, and ISU Extension and Outreach specialists has been overwhelmingly positive. In some cases, it has led to expanded on-farm water sampling to gather additional or more precise data, ongoing monitoring to gather baseline results, and changes in nitrogen management and practice adoption. Thanks to our funding partners, we are still able to offer farmers their first retaiN kit at no cost.  Additional kits can be purchased for $39 and can be requested through the project website www.retainiowa.com/.

The retaiN project demonstrates the power of information when it comes to reducing the amount of nitrate that leaves a farmer’s land through their tile lines. The more farmers learn about the quality of the water leaving their land, the closer we will get to achieving our Nutrient Reduction Strategy goals, one retaiN kit at a time.

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Jamie Benning

retaiN is a collaboration between Conservation Districts of Iowa, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and Iowa Learning Farms with support from the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Division of Soil Conservation and Water Quality. Jamie Benning is an Iowa Learning Farms team member and Water Quality Program Manager at Iowa State University.

Thinking Like a Watershed

Today’s guest post is by Steve Hopkins, Nonpoint Source Coordinator with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources Watershed Improvement Section.

I had the privilege of visiting the legendary Aldo Leopold farm and shack near Baraboo, Wisconsin last August while attending the Soil and Water Conservation Society’s annual conference.  Although I had completed my master’s degree just down the road at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, I had never before visited the Leopold farm. It was in many ways a pilgrimage to a sacred place.Oct2017_1Leopold Shack near Baraboo, Wisconsin (photo by Steve Hopkins)

While standing in awe in front of the Leopold shack, amidst the towering pines and deep-rooted prairie plants that the Leopold family had planted back in the 1930s, I was struck with the meaning behind Leopold’s concept of “Thinking Like a Mountain” in his 1944 essay bearing that name.

Leopold came up with the concept after watching a wolf die that he had shot, and seeing the “fierce green fire dying in her eyes.” Although he had previously been a staunch proponent of killing wolves with the idea of increasing the number of deer (which he and others wanted more of for hunting), he later realized that removing wolves resulted in an overpopulation of deer. Too many deer meant overgrazing and over-browsing of vegetation on the mountain, and the eventual destruction of the mountain from erosion.  Watching the wolf die was a pivotal event for Leopold—one that deeply affected his thinking about the value of predators to keep ecosystems in balance, and reinforced his understanding that removing even a single species can have serious negative consequences on the environment.

As Leopold wrote in 1944 in “Thinking Like a Mountain” (from Flader, 1974, p. 1)¹:

“We reached the old wolf in time to watch a fierce green fire dying in her eyes.  I realized then, and have known ever since, that there was something new to me in those eyes—something known only to her and to the mountain. I was young then, and full of trigger-itch; I thought that because fewer wolves meant more deer, that no wolves would mean hunters’ paradise. But after seeing the fierce green fire die, I sensed that neither the wolf nor the mountain agreed with such a view.”

“Thinking Like a Mountain”, therefore, means we need to consider the importance of ecological balance—including the value of a single species of predator—in our land use decision-making and actions. When we remove even one single species from the ecosystem, it can have dire consequences. It means we need to see things from the mountain’s perspective before acting.

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Oct2017_2World’s 2nd oldest restored prairie, Leopold Farm, Baraboo, Wisconsin (photo by Steve Hopkins)

Likewise, for those of us working to improve the health of watersheds, we need to be thinking like a watershed.”  This means we need to consider the consequences of even a single action on the health of a watershed before acting.

Healthy watersheds are those that act like a sponge to soak in rainfall, enabling the watershed to minimize flooding and reduce runoff that carries pollutants to our lakes, rivers, and streams. Every time a single action takes place that adds more runoff in a watershed, such as adding more paved areas or converting land from soil-covering, deep-rooted perennials to tilled row crops, it reduces the watershed’s ability to act like a sponge and soak in rainfall. When this happens, a watershed “catches” less and “sheds” more. When multiple “single actions” take place in a watershed, it results in flooding and water quality problems. Our primary course of action after that point is to invest lots of time, money, and energy to fixing the flooding and water quality problems that we did not prevent in the first place.

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Many of us are already very well aware of the many practices that are available to soak in, trap, or store rainfall before it runs off our watersheds in Iowa. Many are also working to develop detailed watershed improvement plans to help fix flooding and water quality problems across the state. Just as Aldo Leopold advised us to incorporate “thinking like a mountain” into our actions to improve ecosystems, we would be wise to incorporate thinking like a watershed into each of our plans and actions to improve watersheds. I suspect Leopold would agree.

Steve Hopkins

Reference:
¹Flader, Susan L., Thinking Like a Mountain: Aldo Leopold and the Evolution of an Ecological Attitude toward Deer, Wolves, and Forests (University of Wisconsin Press, 1974).

Oct2017_3Leopold benches at the Leopold Farm, Baraboo, Wisconsin (photo by Steve Hopkins)

Got a Gully? Fix It, Don’t Disc It.

Iowa NRCS has launched a new campaign, “Fix It, Don’t Disc it” to help inform Iowa farmers about a conservation compliance change that requires treating ephemeral gully erosion on highly erodible land (HEL).  Continue reading for their recent newsletter article regarding the rule change.

If you discover areas of ephemeral gully erosion this fall, visit your local Natural Resources Conservation Service office before discing any areas of highly erodible fields.  Iowa famers who participate in USDA programs will now be required to provide additional control of ephemeral gully erosion on their highly erodible fields after recent changes in conservation compliance requirements, State Conservationist Kurt Simon said.

 

This change is in response to a recent Office of Inspector General (OIG) report comparing compliance review procedures in several states. OIG recommended modifications to NRCS’ compliance review procedures to provide more consistency across the nation. Thus, Iowa NRCS has made compliance review procedure adjustments that might impact farmers.

Since the passage of the 1985 Farm Bill, farmers have been required to control erosion on fields that are classified as highly erodible. Each spring, NRCS conducts compliance reviews on a random selection of highly erodible fields to determine if erosion has been adequately controlled. A non-compliance ruling can affect benefits that farmers receive from USDA agencies in a number of ways—from Conservation Reserve program payments to Price Loss Coverage.

“Affected farmers will need to consider installing additional conservation practices to better control ephemeral gully erosion,” Simon said.

Typical practices used to control ephemeral gullies include no-till farming, cover crops, grassed waterways, and terraces. Simon said NRCS employees will work closely with farmers to help them meet erosion-control requirements.

 

“We are available to help farmers identify ephemeral erosion in their fields or where it may occur in the future, and assist them with applying the conservation practices that best fit their farming operations,” he said.

If erosion control issues are identified during compliance reviews, producers may be given time to make adjustments and install needed conservation practices. He said Iowa NRCS offers financial assistance to help farmers install or implement conservation practices across the state. Landowners can sign up for voluntary Farm Bill conservation programs on a continual basis.

When in doubt, visit your local NRCS office before performing any tillage that is not part of your conservation plan on any land classified as HEL. For more information, visit NRCS at your local USDA Service Center.