Youth outreach in full force

It is spring time and with that brings many youth indoor and outdoor visits. Through our program Water Rocks! (www.waterrocks.org), our team has already  been to over 20 youth events and reached all four corners of the state. Whether it’s Dubuque County one day and Pottawattamie the next, we always enjoy seeing Iowa’s diverse topography (despite the common misconception that all of Iowa looks the same!).

Here are some photographs from a few of our visits.

Students learn how the landscapes in Iowa have changed over the last 150 years.

Students learn how the landscapes in Iowa have changed over the last 150 years.

Here students play a modified version of hopscotch called "Habitat Hopscotch". The squares represent the flyways that migrating birds take every year. Each round sees a different state disappear representing the loss of the wetland habitat within that state. The students quickly learned how challenging the migration can be with the loss of each habitat. Not all "birds" made the trip.

Students play a modified version of hopscotch called “Habitat Hopscotch.” The squares represent the flyways that migrating birds take every year. Each round sees a different state disappear representing the loss of the wetland habitat within that state. The students quickly learned how challenging the migration can be with the loss of each habitat. Not all “birds” made the trip.

(Left) Students name off all of the wildlife they can think of that may live in a wetland. (Right) Students watch how wetlands act as natural filters of sediment.

(Left) Students name off all of the wildlife they can think of that may live in a wetland. (Right) Students watch how wetlands act as natural filters of sediment.

(Left) Parents and their children learn about watersheds and all the ways we can better protect our rivers and lakes from pollution. (Right) A new Conservation Pack member.

(Left) Parents and their children learn about watersheds and all the ways we can better protect our rivers and lakes from pollution. (Right) A new Conservation Pack member (www.conservationpack.org).

(Left) Here students are given a piece of land and are asked to develop it how ever they would like. Later they learn how their decisions may alter the water quality around them. (Right)  The Conservation Station Rainfall Simulator.

(Left) Students are given a piece of land and are asked to develop it however they would like. Later they learn how their decisions may alter the water quality around them. (Right) The CS3 Rainfall Simulator.

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