Conservation Practice Showcase Showdown

Who would have thought that the best time of year to catch a field day would be in the beginning of August? The temperature when we started was in the low 80’s and by the time we finished it was in the mid 60’s. No bugs, no humidity… perfect. The turnout was also fantastic with over 60 in attendance.

DSC_2170The event was held at the Iowa State University Uthe Farm near Madrid, in partnership with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, and Iowa State University Research and Demonstration Farms. Attendees had the opportunity to tour four conservation practices installed at the farm.

Saturated Buffers

Tom Isenhart, ISU Natural Resource Ecology and Management Professor kicked things off. He spoke about the origins of the saturated buffer practice and how incredibly effective they are at removing nitrates from the water.

“We raise the water table so that the water soaks into the black soil, where all the microbes are. We are sending water into the stream that is much cleaner than when we received it.” ~Tom Isenhart

An attendee asks, “Is that why they are called saturated buffers?” Tom replies, “Exactly!”

Bioreactors

Michelle Soupir, ISU Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Associate Professor, and Natasha Hoover, ISU Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Research Associate, led the discussion on bioreactors. They talked about installation, costs and how they are experimenting with corn cob bioreactors.

“We have some pilot scale bioreactors that have been replaced with corn cobs. We know they work better, but there are still design questions about how long they last.” ~Michelle Soupir

They took a sample and used a nitrate test strip at the inlet and outlet of the bioreactor to see how effective it was at removing nitrate from the water. The results were quick – 25ppm at the inlet and 0ppm at the outlet.

Oxbows

Adam Janke, ISU Natural Resource Ecology and Management Assistant Professor and Extension Wildlife Specialist, and Sean McCoy, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship Environmental Specialist, talked about how important oxbows are to water quality as well as habitat.

“Oxbows are an attempt to slow the water down to allow denitrification to take place. However, there is a secondary benefit to oxbows and that is the aesthetics and the wildlife.” ~Adam Janke

When asked what his dream species would be in the oxbow, Janke replied that it would probably be the Topeka Shiner.

Pollinator Habitat

As the sun began to set, Seth Appelgate with ISU Monarch Research Team, spoke to the importance of reestablishing pollinator habitat. He suggested that there were many areas that people mow that could be converted with minimal cost.

“Pollinator habitat is actually cheaper over the long run because you save time and money mowing it. It’s more attractive, covers a larger area and has diverse stands that help with water infiltration. Plus, monarchs need these areas.” ~Seth Appelgate

If you’re interested in learning more about bioreactors, saturated buffers or other conservation practices, check out our upcoming field days to see if there will be one near you!

Nathan Stevenson

It’s Opening Week!

ILFHeader(15-year)Thought I was talking about baseball didn’t you?

This week we kicked off our spring field day/workshop season with a stop in Jefferson. Yesterday we held a Cover Crops and Grazing Cover Crops Field Day at the McNay Research Farm near Chariton.

The leadoff speaker was Chariton farmer Duane Steenhoek, who talked about his experience growing and grazing cover crops.

“The best part is we get over 30 days where the calves didn’t even touch the feeders. They gained 50 pounds from the cover crops.” Steenhoek said. “It’s funny watching them walk around carrying turnips in their mouth, but they love them.”

On deck was Liz Juchems with the Iowa Learning Farms. She shared the main findings from an ILF 10-year study on cover crops and what impact they have on yield. She also hit on planter settings, cost share opportunities and how oats and cereal rye are great for rookies.

Closing out the field day were ISU Extension Field Agronomist Rebecca Vittetoe and ISU Beef Field Specialist Erika Lundy. They spoke to utilizing cover crops as a forage source. They covered seeding methods, the importance of your herbicide program, possible grazing issues and which species to select for maximum grazing benefits.

Lundy says, “If you want to graze in the fall and spring, I recommend planting oats and cereal rye. Because oats will grow quicker in the fall and cereal rye will shoot up in the spring.” 

If you weren’t able to attend this event, there are more opportunities to attend one of our upcoming workshops or field days!

March 28 – Cover Crop and No-Till Workshop
12:00-2:00PM

Titan Machinery
3093 220th St.
Williams, IA 50271
Hamilton County
RSVP: 515-294-5429 or ilf@iastate.edu
Press Release
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April 9 – Cover Crop and Water Quality Field Day
5:00-7:00PM

Rob Stout Farm
2449 Hemlock Ave
Washington, IA 52353
Washington County
RSVP: 515-294-5429 or ilf@iastate.edu
Press Release
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April 10 – Cover Crop and No-Till Workshop
12:00-2:00pm
Steier Ag Aviation
202 190th St
Whittemore, IA 50598
Kossuth County
RSVP: 515-294-5429 or ilf@iastate.edu
Press Release
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~Nathan

 

Cover Crops Served with a Side of Comedy

If you enjoy cover crops with a side of comedy, then you missed out on a good one.

The Iowa Learning Farms, along with Iowa Seed Corn Cover Crop InitiativeIowa Corn, and USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, hosted a cover crop and conservation tillage field day at the Kossuth County Museum in Algona.

Kossuth County farmers Matt and Nancy Bormann share their experience with cover crops.

Liz Juchems kicked things off with talk of cover crops, species selection and the farmer’s best friend, the Lumbricus terrestris or earthworm. “We have found a 40% increase in earthworm middens in fields with cover crops,” stated Juchems. Turns out that cover crops are the earthworms best friend.

Doug Adams, a farmer and NRCS Soil Conservation Technician gave a play-by-play of his progression from conventional tillage to strip-till and no-till with cover crops.

Kossuth County farmers Matt and Nancy Bormann gave a great presentation on their farming history and offered some real gems. 

Of course, Matt did offer some more conventional advice. “Switching to strip-till helped us cut out a quarter million in equipment. My tip is to try something different on 40 acres…you have to get out of your comfort zone.”

Comedy is clearly not out of Matt’s comfort zone because he had the whole room laughing.

Reminder: If you missed this field day, be sure to tune in to our webinar December 12th at Noon to learn how #NotillB4Beans and #CoverYourBeans can help save time and money.

~Nathan Stevenson

 

Cover Crops on Tap at Nick Meier Field Day

ILFHeaderAs the weather gets colder and the days grow shorter, evening cover crop field days move indoors. Fortunately, the indoor atmosphere was perfect for an informal cover crop discussion.

The Nick Meier Field Day was hosted at Single Speed Brewery in Waterloo where attendees enjoyed several different varieties of flat bread pizza made from local ingredients. After dinner, the conversations turned toward cover crops, crop insurance, herbicide planning, soil health, earthworms and water sampling.

“Sampling your water is not something to be afraid of. It’s something to understand.” Theo Gunther, Iowa Soybean Association

There was particular interest in the earthworm study being done by the Iowa Learning Farms. Jamie Benning led the discussion and had some updates to share about the study.“Preliminary data determined that there was a 40% increase in earthworm middens found in fields with a cover crop versus without cover crops.”  Jamie Benning, Extension Water Quality Program Manager

The evening concluded with an excellent farmer panel where they discussed their experience using cover crops, planting into cover crops and tips for termination.

The field day was hosted by Practical Farmers of Iowa, the Iowa Farmers Union, the Soil Health Partnership, the Iowa Seed Association, the Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship Clean Water Initiative, Iowa Corn, Iowa Soybean Association and the Iowa Agriculture Water Alliance and Iowa Learning Farms.

If you missed the field day and are interested in attending one this month, visit our events page to find one near you and RSVP today!

 

~Nathan

Edge of Field Practices Steal the Show

Participants at the August 9th field day in Spirit Lake were treated to burgers, information and one spectacular view.

DSC_1541_edited

Over 50 people attended the Wetland, Saturated Buffer and Bioreactor Field Day hosted by Prairie Lakes Conference and Dickinson County Soil and Water Conservation District. They came to learn how edge of field practices like wetlands, saturated buffers and bioreactors are key to reducing nitrate loss from agricultural land in Iowa. However, they stuck around long after to take pictures and to discuss about how beautiful the project had turned out.

Chris LaRue of the Iowa DNR, and Heather Jobst of the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation explained, “This is a perfect example of what happens when many partners come together with a shared vision, and stay unified.”

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Golfers can be seen in the distance playing a round at the Okoboji View Golf Course.

One key stakeholder who participated in the wetland restoration project was the Okoboji View Golf Course, which sits right behind the project.  Staff from the golf course led a discussion about their experience and the economic upside to the project.

“We have actually seen an increase in our business as a direct result of the project. It is very beautiful to be out here,” explained a staff member.

The Spirit Lake restoration project really is the perfect example of public and private stakeholders coming together with a shared goal. It is also a great example of a project bringing urban and rural issues together.

It’s a win-win for everyone involved, especially the lake.

~Nathan Stevenson

 

 

Webinar Recap: Creating Conservation Legacies Through Farm Leases

Our June webinar featured Sara Berges, project coordinator with the Allamakee Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD). Her presentation focused on three main areas: How to include conservation in a lease, developing a Farm Legacy Report and cover crops with manure.

There is a real need to include conservation within a farm lease. Low commodity prices have led to more ground being converted into row crop agriculture according to Berges. Coupled with the fact that over 50% of Iowa ground is leased by absentee and non-farming landowners.

“We noticed that conservation is often left out of lease discussions. Leases tend to be fairly basic and cover mainly when rent is due and how much”    -Sara Berges

If you missed the webinar and would like more information on this topic, an archived version is available on our website: https://www.iowalearningfarms.org/page/webinars.

~Nathan

Fly the “W”

blog-header-cubsI love October especially when the Cubs are still playing baseball. Of course as I write this, the series is tied 1-1 and so by the time this is published, the Cubs might not still be playing baseball. But for right now, it is October and the Cubs are in the playoffs and life is good!

Along with postseason baseball, October also brings the fall colors. The other day I was walking through Ames’ largest cemetery and enjoying the beauty of all the trees. Cemeteries are havens of peace and good places to think. My ILF E-News column was due soon and I had no good ideas. I was hoping this walk might shake something loose.

I asked myself, can I tie the Cubs, cemeteries and the Nutrient Reduction Strategy (NRS) together for my column?

cubsgameAs I walked, I noticed a half a dozen graves that were flying the blue “W” near the headstones. For those of you who are not Cubs fans and were in a foreign country last year when they finally won the World Series, the blue “W” represents a Cubs’ win. Now I didn’t check the tombstones for year of death but I am guessing that a few of them died before November of last year and this was the family’s way of acknowledging how important the win would have been for them.

As I walked, I called fellow Cubs fan Jamie Benning and shared with her my observation about the “W” in the cemetery. Did she think I could link the nutrient reduction strategy and Cubs for my column? Jamie suggested exploring if there was anything to learn from the road to the Cubs 2016 World Series victory and the power of a symbol such as the “W” that could apply to NRS implementation.

Of course, we both thought that was a good idea so I went home and gave it some thought. In order for the Cubs to have a chance at a national championship, several things had to happen.

JCq

Most of this work happened in the off-season and most national championships are won by what happens during the periods when the team is not playing ball.

If we want to have greater success in implementing Iowa’s NRS, I think we have some valuable lessons to take from the Cubs’ success.

ILFq

It is October. The growing season is over (if you haven’t planted cover crops) and the cash crops are being harvested. The next several months could be considered the “off-season” for those who don’t have livestock. There is a lot of work to do right now to lay the groundwork for greater success in implementing the NRS in the years to come. ‘Cause just like in baseball, next year begins right now.

Jacqueline Comito