Two Field Day Opportunities July 9th – Native Perennial Plantings and Cover Crops, Grazing and Soil Health!

The Iowa Learning Farms team is pulling a double header and hosting two events on Tuesday, July 9th. We’d love to have you join us!

Both include a complimentary meal, so RSVP today to help with the meal planning.

July 9, Native Perennial Planting Workshop
10:00am-12:00pm
Whiterock Conservancy Burr Oak Visitor’s Center
1436 IA-141
Coon Rapids, IA
Guthrie County
Partner: Iowa State University Extension and Outreach
Press Release
Flyer
RSVP: 515-294-5429 or ilf@iastate.edu

July 9, Cover Crop and Soil Health Field Day
5:30-7:30pm
Ray & Elaine Gaesser Farm
2507 Quince Ave
Corning, IA
Adams County
Partners: Soil Health Partnership, Adams County Farm Bureau, Iowa Corn, Iowa Soybean Association, National Wildlife Federation Cover Crop Champions Program
Press Release
Flyer
RSVP: 515-294-5429 or ilf@iastate.edu

Liz Juchems

Discovering My Passion

ILFHeader(15-year)IMG_4905This is my second summer working with Water Rocks! and Iowa Learning Farms, my first being the summer of 2017. There have been a few moments throughout this summer that made me realize how much I have changed since I first began my internship here two years ago.

Back when I started, I had just changed majors to become a biosystems engineering major, and I was set that I was going to do the bioprocessing/biofuels track. Through my experience with the water resources internship, I found what I really wanted to do, which was working with water quality and other environmental issues.

When I first began the internship, I knew nothing about agriculture, water quality issues, or anything about what I wanted to do in the future. Now, besides the knowledge and experience I have gained through my education and my internships, I also have some solid ideas about what I want to do.

I realized this very recently through two very different workdays.

The first was field work we did for the monarch butterfly survey. We had to trudge through thick, soggy grass taller than me and fight off mosquitos and ticks while looking for milkweed plants in CRP fields. It was miserable, annoying, and painful, but also somehow fun! It was cool to learn how to identify the different species of milkweed, and it was a great feeling when you finally found a plant while walking in circles in chest tall grass for what seemed like hours (even though it was probably 5 minutes).

Monarch MonitoringIt was simultaneously one of the most fun and most miserable days of the summer. And with the help of an entire can of bugs pray, I’m still here! If you had asked me at the beginning of the summer 2 years ago to do that, I’m not sure what I would have done. I do know that I would have had a much worse attitude about it, and that I would not have had any fun whatsoever. I think that represents one way that I have grown, which is to be better at taking things as they come and dealing with it. I think is a very valuable attitude to have in the environmental field, because nothing ever goes as planned when it comes to nature.

The other day was one where I had to present the Conservation Station On the Edge trailer at a field day in NW Iowa. I had been on field days like this before, but with a staff member, and so I had heard this being presented but had never done it myself. I was nervous about doing this myself, because I was worried that I would get questions I couldn’t handle or forget to mention something important. I knew that I had learned a lot of this stuff through coursework and the internship, but I somehow felt that I still wasn’t prepared. But everything went well. I presented the models and information for both the saturated buffer and woodchip bioreactor, and it seemed like I was keeping the audience’s attention.

When it got to time to ask questions, I was nervous, but as they came, I found myself naturally answering them. It turns out, shockingly, that I learned something in college. I think that a major reason that I was nervous for grad school was that somehow, I felt that I wasn’t ready, and that I had managed to fake my way through college. That presentation was one of the first times that I felt confident in what I had learned and my ability to explain it to someone effectively. This has given me a lot of confidence for the future. Going from not knowing a thing about this field two years ago all the way to explaining edge of field practices to landowners is quite a jump, and something that I’m proud of.

Water Rocks! and ILF have really shaped my educational career, and it is an experience that I will take with me and remember for a long time.

Andrew Hillman is participating in the 2019 Water Resources Internship Program at Iowa State University.  Hillman grew up in Bettendorf and graduated from Iowa State University with a degree in Biosystems Engineering. He is off to North Carolina State University to pursue a graduate degree in the fall.

Change to Haying and Grazing Date for Cover Crop Prevented Planting Acres

Risk Management Agency Release, June 20, 2019

Farmers who planted cover crops on prevented plant acres will be permitted to hay, graze or chop those fields earlier than November this year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced today. USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) adjusted the 2019 final haying and grazing date from November 1 to September 1 to help farmers who were prevented from planting because of flooding and excess rainfall this spring.

“We recognize farmers were greatly impacted by some of the unprecedented flooding and excessive rain this spring, and we made this one-year adjustment to help farmers with the tough decisions they are facing this year,” said Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey. “This change will make good stewardship of the land easier to accomplish while also providing an opportunity to ensure quality forage is available for livestock this fall.”

RMA has also determined that silage, haylage and baleage should be treated in the same manner as haying and grazing for this year. Producers can hay, graze or cut cover crops for silage, haylage or baleage on prevented plant acres on or after September 1 and still maintain eligibility for their full 2019 prevented planting indemnity.

“These adjustments have been made for 2019 only,” said RMA Administrator Martin Barbre. “RMA will evaluate the prudence of a permanent adjustment moving forward.”

Other USDA Programs

Other USDA agencies are also assisting producers with delayed or prevented planting. USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) is extending the deadline to report prevented plant acres in select counties, and USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is holding special sign-ups for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program in certain states to help with planting cover crops on impacted lands. Contact your local FSA and NRCS offices to learn more.

More Information

Read our frequently asked questions to learn more about prevented plant.

Crop insurance is sold and delivered solely through private crop insurance agents. A list of crop insurance agents is available at all USDA Service Centers and online at the RMA Agent Locator. Learn more about crop insurance and the modern farm safety net at rma.usda.gov.

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USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.

Faces of Conservation: Rob Stout

This blog post is part of the Faces of Conservation series, highlighting key contributors to ILF, offering their perspectives on the history and successes of this innovative conservation outreach program.


ROB STOUT
Farmer-Partner with Iowa Learning Farms

Rob Stout has been farming near West Chester, Iowa, since graduating from Iowa State University (ISU) in 1978. Rob has demonstrated high levels of interest in conservation and water quality and has gotten involved in a variety of efforts to advocate for improvements. This has extended to his own farming choices which have included no-till for many years as well as participation in multiple research studies with ISU.

What has been your involvement and role with ILF?
I started working with the Iowa Learning Farms team in 2006. The ILF commitment to creating a Culture of Conservation resonated with my own interest in achieving water quality improvement through agricultural practices.

We got in on the first year of the long-term cover crop study and I’m proud to say we recently reported our tenth year of data. But it didn’t take me 10 years to see the benefits. The only parts of my farm fields not in cover crops now are the four test strips I keep for comparison in the ILF study.

The farmer-to-farmer communications element of the ILF outreach is very effective, and I’ve hosted field days, invited friends and neighbors to learn about conservation techniques, and volunteered to speak at ILF-sponsored events and meetings.

Why did you get involved with ILF?
Previously, I had been involved in several ISU research projects to help learn and improve farming techniques. I was also already involved in water quality initiatives. I saw working with ILF as an opportunity to learn more and work with others interested in water quality improvement.

The Culture of Conservation concept captured my interest. The ILF approach to research and outreach fit well with my own passion for learning and doing more to protect and promote the natural ecosystem through better agricultural practices.


How did you change the program, and how did it change you?
I don’t think I individually changed the ILF program, but I’ve always been pleased with the genuine interest they’ve shown in learning from farmers through listening to – and acting upon – feedback and ideas from the farmers. Through hosting and participating in field days, showing others the application of conservation practices, and joining in farmer-to-farmer interactions, I think I’ve provided valuable feedback and helped open new ears to the messages of ILF.

I’ve learned a lot from my involvement with ILF. I loved doing research when I was at ISU, and participating with ILF gives me a chance to continue learning while staying involved in research efforts.

I’ve also grown in my understanding of conservation and water quality issues. In 1983 I was doing no-till and thought I was doing everything I could. I initially thought of conservation simply as erosion control. The ILF cover crop study helped broaden my perspective and knowledge about practices that have changed the way I approach farming and conservation. ILF helped me to become an advocate and a voice of experience for farmers who may be interested in learning about the research from someone who has done it.


What are your fondest memories of working with ILF?
A favorite memory is of a field day we were hosting for ILF. As often happens in Iowa, Mother Nature didn’t cooperate, and we had torrential rains dropping some 3.5 inches on the morning of the event. We quickly cleared the shop to make room for the participants and were able to have a great experience. However, I think the rainfall simulator in the Conservation Station trailer didn’t need to use its own water supply that day!

Why are water quality and conservation outreach important to you and to Iowa?
I care about the environment and the future of our agricultural-based economy. Everyone, including farmers, must take responsibility and do their part to help reduce nitrates in our water. I think the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy‘s goals are critical for the future of the state.

I’ve been learning about watersheds and water quality since the early 2000s when I joined a farmer-led watershed group working to restore a local impaired creek. We secured grants to install bioreactors and a saturated buffer, implemented buffer strips along creeks, and took other positive steps to improve the watershed. To me, this kind of on-the-ground action is a core element to creating the Culture of Conservation which will benefit all Iowans.


Previous Posts in our Faces of Conservation series:

Drainage Water Recycling: An Emerging Conservation Drainage Practice

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On Wednesday, during an Iowa Learning Farms webinar, Chris Hay, Senior Environmental Scientist at the Iowa Soybean Association, discussed current drainage water recycling research.

Drainage water recycling is a conservation practice during which subsurface drainage water is captured for use as supplemental irrigation water in the summer. In addition to the irrigation benefit, drainage water recycling reduces nitrogen and phosphorus loss by reusing the water in the field.

Hay described drainage water recycling as a multiple “win-win” scenario, where the farmer is able to address excess water in the spring and fall through drainage, but also during dry periods in the summer by using the captured drainage water as supplemental irrigation. The practice can also prevent loss of nutrients downstream and captures water containing both nitrogen and phosphorus, while many other other conservation practices only address one nutrient of concern. The practice can also lead to a flood peak reduction and have positive impacts on downstream water quantity.

Current research projects at sites around the Midwest have been looking at yield increases with the supplemental irrigation that drainage water recycling supplies and have found that during dry years they saw a 50% corn yield increase and a 29% soybean yield increase. Hay stated that although the idea of drainage water recycling is not new, it is an emerging conservation practice that has attracted more attention recently and that more research is needed to understand the benefits and economics. To learn more the ongoing research, visit the Transforming Drainage website.

To learn more about this topic, watch the full webinar here!

Join us next month, on Wednesday, July 17 at noon, when Laurie Nowatzke, Measurement Coordinator for the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy at Iowa State University, will present an Iowa Learning Farms webinar titled “The Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy Measurement Project: Tracking Progress Towards Iowa’s Water Quality Goals”.

Hilary Pierce

Celebrity Status

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I have always been around people younger than me.  Whether it was my thirteen-month younger sister, my six younger cousins, or the kids that I provided care for during the summer.  No matter the relation, these small humans were in every corner of my life, not that I was complaining.  I love being with kids and seeing their unique perspective of the world and how they continuously grow.  Which is why this Water Rocks! internship truly jumped out to me.

IMG_5043In the short amount of time being involved in this program, I have visit been able to educate and inform numerous young minds about the world around them, and what they can do to make Iowa a healthier and cleaner place to live.  Little did I know; I was also going to get the honor of being admired in some of strangest yet heartwarming ways possible.

The first experience was some one-of-a-kind hand-crafted money.  Which was bestowed to me by a sixth grader claiming we were not getting paid enough for what we do.  Each of us that day received two of these unique hundred-dollar bills.  That was not all, the same child came back moments later with three whole pieces of paper and gave each of us large gold replicas of the previous bill, and said, “Here’s a bonus because I actually learned something today.”

The next form of admiration was a fourth-grade begging for the autographs of everyone that presented to him that day.  To say the least all of the interns that day, myself included were a bit dumb-struck.  We had no idea what to say, except asking our supervisor if it was allowed.  When we got the nod of approval, we all started scribbling down our names on the paper. As soon as we were all done the student clung the paper to his chest and gave us a quick thank you before joining the rest of his class lining up at the door.SignaturesLeaving each event, our team discusses the event on the trip back to Ames.  Talking about how we would buy a fancy house with our new found money, get stopped on the street for a picture, or be asked to be featured in Times magazine.  Although small gestures, I knew that what we did truly touched theses students, we helped shape their future in some way.  Whether they do something as small as picking up a piece of trash or going into a career that helps the environment.  I knew this was possible with children that I saw repeatedly, but I did not comprehend that it could be accomplished in fifty minutes or less.  What these kids did reassures me that the same can be done in the outreach events later this summer.   Now I know I have the power to inform all ages of the importance of the environment and conservation.

Clara Huber is participating in the 2019 Water Resources Internship Program at Iowa State University.  Huber grew up in DeWitt and in the fall, she will be starting her sophomore year at Iowa State University, majoring in Biosystems Engineering.

Cues to Care – Tips for Adding Native Perennials to Your Property

ILFHeader(15-year)Our second Native Perennial Plantings workshop was held at the Spirit Lake Community Center last night and we had another great group eager to learn about native perennial plantings for their properties.

There is interest in adding perennials to both urban and rural landscapes as a way to help improve water quality, water infiltration and wildlife habitat. How to overcome the challenges to appreciate those benefits was one of the many topics that was discussed.

“One of the challenges of adding perennials, like prairie, to the landscape or as landscaping around our property is perceptions and judgement from our neighbors. It takes time for the prairie to establish and in the meantime it can look like a weed patch,” reported an attendee.

Lisa Schulte-Moore (left) and Emily Heaton (right) tapped into their extension knowledge of native perennial plants to help provide some tips for those looking to add perennials on their properties and I would like to share those with you.

Cues to Care to indicate that your efforts are intentional

  • Add a border to the perennial area – rocks, landscaping trim
  • Put out a sign – “Prairie Under Construction” or “Pollinator Habitat”
  • Seed the plants in groupings using plugs instead of broadcast a seed mix

If you are interested in adding perennial plantings to your property, a good starting place is this article from Iowa State Extension and Outreach Horticulturist, Richard Jauron: Yard and Garden: Selecting Perennials.

Be sure to join us for our third native perennial plantings workshop on July 9th at Whiterock Conservancy.

July 9, Native Perennial Planting Workshop
10:00am-12:00pm
Whiterock Conservancy Burr Oak Visitor’s Center
1436 IA-141
Coon Rapids, IA
Guthrie County
Partner: Iowa State University Extension and Outreach
Press Release
Flyer

Liz Juchems