Outdoor Adventure + Exploration with Water Rocks! Camps

Today’s guest blog post comes from summer intern Elizabeth Schwab. Originally from Levittown, PA (just outside Philadelphia), Elizabeth is a senior at ISU, double majoring in Environmental Science and Agronomy. She is also a radio DJ at 88.5 FM KURE on the side!

Monday, June 26, we held our first of a series of three Water Rocks! Summer Day Camps, this one in the beautiful Winterset City Park in Madison County. I saw my first of the famed Madison County covered bridges (the Cutler-Donahoe Covered Bridge) on the drive to the shelter where we set up camp, but unfortunately the bridge didn’t appear to be designed to handle the fifteen-passenger van we were traveling in. I’ll have to return to Madison County to tour the covered bridges some other time.

After organizing our supplies and activities, we were ready to begin our day; shortly thereafter, the campers began to arrive. The 23 campers, ages nine to fourteen, were organized into two packs, each led by two Water Rocks! team members. My fellow intern Andrew and I spent our day with the blue pack, who soon named themselves the “Blue Ferrets,” while Jenn and Josh led the red pack.

We kicked off the morning with some music and dancing led by Todd. I’m not much of a dancer, as anyone who saw me “on stage” on Monday morning can confirm. However, I was excited that some of the more exuberant campers soon joined our staff up front to show off their moves (and prove that they have much more talent than I do). This was a great high-energy start to the day! After we were all welcomed to camp, we split up into our packs for some icebreakers and time to get to know each other, and then we were able to dive into the lessons!

One of my favorite aspects of the educational modules that the Water Rocks! team presents is that they make education a lot of fun, both for the presenters and the audience. For the first part of the morning, Jenn and I led each pack through sessions on wetlands, which involved playing such games as Habitat Hopscotch and Wetland Bingo.

Throughout the day, campers also learned about watersheds, contemplated biodiversity (while playing Biodiversity Jenga and Musical Oxbows), and participated in a “game show” with our Dig Into Soil module! In times like these, I sometimes wish to be an observer rather than a presenter at our outreach events. I have learned, however, that leading students or campers through these activities is just as fun, even if it means that I can’t win prizes in Wetland Bingo or develop my own piece of lakeside property during the Watershed module.

What better way is there to reflect on why we should conserve and appreciate our water resources than by playing a few water games? After lunch and a quick trip to the playground, the packs competed against each other to play a few games, with bucket relays and water balloons proving to be the stars of the show. It just wouldn’t be summer camp without water sports, and these activities were certainly a memorable part of the camp experience!

It was a busy day in Winterset, and by the end of the camp day everyone was ready to take things a little more slowly. We ended our day by making “edible soil” to complement the afternoon’s lesson about soil, and then spent some time reflecting and writing in the nature journals that we created during arts and crafts time earlier in the day. This was a great way to wrap up our day—I’m excited about nearly any opportunity that involves either chocolate pudding or crafts, and being able to tie both of these to other topics that I’m passionate about was an added bonus.

As the campers departed at the end of the day, many of them expressed interest in returning for future events or camps. I am proud to have been a part of making this day memorable for so many young people, and I am thrilled to have the opportunity to return to our next two Water Rocks! camps in Des Moines on July 6 and 7. Every time I go to an event or camp I discover something new about communicating scientific information in a way that is engaging to the audience as well as to me as an educator. And I get to have fun doing it! There really is no better way to learn.

Elizabeth Schwab

NOTE: Limited spots are still available for 9-14 year olds in our upcoming Water Rocks! Summer Day Camps at Greenwood Park in Des Moines – choose from Thursday, July 6 or Friday, July 7!  Do you have a child, grandchild, niece, nephew or neighbor that might be interested?  Camps are FREE of charge; we just require registration in advance. Registrations are being accepted through NOON tomorrow – Friday, June 30.

Inger Lamb: On a Mission to Support Biodiversity With Prairies

Inger Lamb, landowner, PhD, and owner of Prairie Landscapes of Iowa, has a passion for prairie! She puts this passion for native prairie into practice with both her business ventures, and on the agricultural land she owns and co-manages in western Iowa.

Inger inherited her family’s century farm in Monona County in 2000. She entered into a crop-share agreement with her first cousin, who lives on the land and facilitates the daily farming operations, while together they handle land management decisions. The century farm, which has been in operation since 1894, is located in a flood plain. This means that the land contains heavy soils that aren’t well-suited for methods like no-till, paradoxically mixed with sandy areas. After a couple years, Inger and her cousin made the decision to begin transitioning the acres that were least suited to agricultural production into the Conservation Resource Program (CRP). A few years later they discovered that some of her land was eligible for the Wetland Resources Program (WRP) as well. Eventually 80 acres were converted to a permanent easement through the WRP, with an additional fourteen in CRP.

Inger made sure the land taken out of production was put into high quality, diverse prairie. She took advantage of some U.S. Fish & Wildlife cost share dollars available for the permanent easement acres but paid for the remainder of the improved seed mixes out of her own pocket. While Inger admits that farmers are sometimes cautious with new practices and methods, she vehemently disagrees with the idea that farmers are disinterested in conservation. She points out that farming is a business, and every farmer must balance the economic impacts of their decisions with ecological concerns. Establishing conservation practices on the land has to make economic, as well as ecological, sense for farmers to buy in.

The local farming community was a bit reticent of the prairie conversions when they first went in. But as the prairie established, wildlife populations soared. With increased populations of marsh hawks, deer, pheasants, owls, and other wildlife, locals have been eager to enjoy those abundances through hunting. Inger and her cousin are now learning to navigate the many requests for access to their CRP and WRP land for hunting activities, as the local community increasingly appreciates the benefits of their prairie habitat!

Inger has always had a deep connection with the land, and a love for plants especially. She received her undergraduate degree in botany at San Diego State University, and went on to graduate school. Inger completed her PhD at Ohio State University with a focus on plant physiology, specifically the symbiosis of legumes. After graduation she completed a year-long Post Doctoral position before moving with her husband and young son to St. Louis. Once in St. Louis, Inger took a break from the academic world to focus on her family, and to apply her knowledge and interests in plants in a more hands-on way. She began volunteering with the Missouri Botanical Garden, where they were putting in a native landscaping for the home garden demonstration area. This was her first exposure to the idea of using local, native species for gardening, and it is in this way that she started to familiarize herself with native plants.

When her family moved to central Iowa and her son began elementary school, Inger discovered that the school was badly in need of someone to take on the management and upkeep of its outdoor classroom and butterfly garden. Already devoted to volunteer work, Inger took on the role and spent the next six years shaping the native prairie beds into vibrancy, and taking classrooms of elementary students out into the gardens to learn about prairie plants and the wildlife they support. She balanced this volunteer work with her job with Prairie Rivers Natural Resources Conservation Service and Development. Her devotion to the work at her son’s school led Inger to start dreaming of a business model that would allow her to translate her love and knowledge of native prairie into a career.

In 2007, Inger started her own business, Prairie Landscapes of Iowa. Her clients include cities, schools and universities, businesses, homeowner associations, and individual landowners who want to utilize native landscaping on their properties. Prairie Landscapes of Iowa is currently managing sixty projects, including one for a private company in Ames that was started by planting nearly 8000 native plants, now in its fourth year of growth.

What is Inger’s primary motivation for spreading the word about planting native prairie in Iowa? To answer this question, she pulled an autographed book out of the backseat of her vehicle. “Bringing Nature Home,” by Douglas Tallamy, tells the story of how installing native plants in backyards all over the country can save many of our waning wildlife populations from mass extinction. Inger wholeheartedly agrees with this approach to sustaining biodiversity through re-building native habitat, and she routinely gives copies of the book out to her clients.

Iowa Learning Farms is grateful for Inger’s mission to bring native prairie back to Iowa’s landscape in both rural and urban landscapes. From her work to convert portions of her own farmland to CRP and WRP, to sustaining a thriving business that helps others learn how to support native plants on their land, Inger is bringing back a piece of the prairie in Iowa; supporting the survival and biodiversity of our state’s migrating bird and insect species along the way!

Brandy Case Haub

Exploring conservation + ecology at Yellowstone

During our trip to Montana last week to deliver the Wetlands Screening Tool Training with USDA-FSA, we also had the opportunity to take a day trip to Yellowstone National Park. America’s first national park, Yellowstone is truly a gem – a real national treasure!

We started the morning by watching the sun rise over the Absaroka Mountains on the ~2 hour journey from Bozeman, MT.

We followed the winding path of the Yellowstone River as we approached the park entrance, stopping to get our binoculars and scopes out for a close-up view of a large bald eagle along the banks. Did you know?  The Yellowstone River is the longest free-flowing river in the country, at 691 miles long.

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Once inside the park, there are a multitude of vastly different ecosystems present, from grasslands to wetlands to the subalpine forest.

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DSCN9712cWe requested that our guided tour be focused on wildlife, so our guide Will took us on a drive through Yellowstone’s northern loop, stopping at several “hotspots” to try and scope out wildlife.

DSCN9767cThe bison were abundant (there are approximately 5,000 in Yellowstone) and Will told us that “bison jams” like those shown below are a frequent occurrence on the roads winding through the park…

DSCN9700cDSCN9731cNumerous pronghorns also made themselves known…

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In terms of other wildlife, here’s how we did…

Jackie had her eyes to the sky and was definitely our A-Team in terms of spotting cool birds.  The best finds of the day were the golden eagle and Swainson’s hawk – some spectacular raptors!

SwainsonsHawkLiz deserves a gold star for spotting large creatures. As Will, our guide, instructed us, keep your eyes out for the dark blobs and watch their movement. Many of the dark blobs are bison, but occasionally you spot something else…  Liz successfully found both a wolf and a black bear!

DSCN9710cI (Ann) really geeked out over the unique microorganisms in the park – thermophilic bacteria like Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that create other-worldy scenes like the Roaring Mountain shown below.

RoaringMountainOur guide, Will, did a great job explaining to us the balance of different creatures in Yellowstone’s ecosystem, and the population dynamics of how creatures both large and small are reliant upon one another. It’s all so interconnected! And then factor in the plant life, the microorganisms, migration patterns, corridors of habitat, invasive species, wildfires, as well as the interactions with people (both local landowners/ranchers adjacent to the park, let alone the tourists)… and you have a highly complex, interconnected system.

I know that each of us will be integrating many of the things we learned at Yellowstone when we go into classrooms this fall teaching young people about biodiversity and ecosystem balance!

While we did not visit Old Faithful, we did make a stop at the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone…

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Jackie, Liz, and Ann enjoy the spectacular views at Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone — quick break for a selfie with our excellent guide Will!

Despite the millions of visitors the come to Yellowstone each year from across the globe, I was surprised to experience the quiet sense of wonder there – it really didn’t seem busy or congested at all, as people took in the amazing grandeur all around them. Our tour guide Will also knew where he was going and helped navigate the park, minimizing congestion and maximizing our time there to  experience as much as we could in a day trip.

Also, an interesting sign of the times to share – of course there were signs and information about how to stay safe around wildlife, but the National Park Service and tour guides have also begun educating visitors on how to appropriately and safely take selfies around wildlife. Don’t disrespect the bison!

IMG_20160814_130638399One day was certainly not enough to experience all that Yellowstone has to offer, but it gave us a taste and left us hungry for more!

Finally, a quick shoutout to the National Park Service celebrating its 100 year birthday this week. Happy Birthday NPS – here’s to another 100 years!

Ann Staudt

Teachers: Immerse yourself in water + soil this summer!

WR!Summit-FieldTour-BearCreekSeeking a few good teachers…

This is the third year that our sister program Water Rocks! is offering its summer Teacher Summit workshops, and we are looking for a crew of outstanding, enthusiastic teachers from across the state who’d like to participate!  The Water Rocks! Summits are two-day professional development workshops where K-12 teachers are given the opportunity to immerse themselves in all things water. And all things soil.  Oh yes, and there’s also wetlands, biodiversity, watersheds, the water cycle, stormwater, and a conservation field tour…  it’s two full days of diving in deeper with both agriculture and the environment, from a uniquely Iowa perspective!

We are offering two Summits coming up this June:
June 14-15, 2016   -and-  June 22-23,2016

Teachers must apply for the Summit in teams of 2-4 teachers per school. However, it’s NOT just limited to science teachers – our Summits are open to teachers of all subjects and all grade levels!  We embrace the STEM fields as well as music, art, literature, English, and more! Water and soil are intertwined throughtout the fabric of our daily lives; they can be readily integrated throughtout the school day, as well. Interdisciplinary and cross-age teams are highly encouraged.

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The Water Rocks! Teacher Summits offers a balanced blend of content knowledge building for the participants (through talks by Iowa State University faculty and staff working in these fields), as well as highly interactive, engaging and fun delivery mechanisms that are ready to be taken back to the classroom (hands-on games, activities, and lessons for K-12 students).

TeacherTestimonial-GreenEach accepted team goes home with LOOT — an activity kit containing over $800 of hands-on, interactive games, lessons, activities, and more that are fully ready to use in the classroom. We also offer participants travel honorarium payments and the option of obtaining 1 license renewal credit.

Don’t delay – The application deadline for the 2016 Water Rocks! Teacher Summits is Monday, February 29. Yes, it’s LEAP Day… take a leap into this amazing professional development opportunity in 2016!  Get your team assembled, then visit the Application page today to submit your information.

Blog Readers: This is your chance to help us out here. Do you know an elementary or middle school teacher who would thrive at the Water Rocks! Teacher Summit?  Please share this information with them and encourage them to apply!

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This cooperative project has been funded in part through the Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. Partners of Water Rocks! include Iowa Department of Natural Resources (United States Environmental Protection Agency), Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa Water Center, Iowa Learning Farms, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, and personal gifts of support.

Ann Staudt

Spotlight on School Visits

What do JENGA, musical chairs, carpet squares, competition, and creativity all have in common? These are all key ingredients that come together to help educate and inspire the next generation on water, soil, and natural resources, thanks to the Water Rocks! youth outreach program.

Earlier this week, the Water Rocks! team spent two days teaching 5th graders in the Waukee School District all about biodiversity. We visited 5th grade classrooms at Brookview Elementary pyramid_Consumers_biodiversity_module (2)and Woodland Hills Elementary, spending 50 minutes in each individual classroom with our super energetic, super fun “Trees, Bees, and Biodiversity” program!

Over the years, we’ve found that school visits are most effective when we work with one individual class at a time – this offers the greatest opportunity for hands-on, interactive activities, as well as questions and dialogue. And this “Trees, Bees, and Biodiversity” program is chock full of hands-on, interactive games and activities!

Here are a few snapshots to highlight these school visits:

WordItOut-word-cloud-1164025We’re all about building vocabulary in each of our classroom lessons!

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Biodiversity JENGA helps students see the interwoven connections between different living creatures…  the colored blocks correspond to the different trophic levels shown in the pyramid above. Water Rocks! team members draw a “situation” from the “situation jar,” and that lets the students know which block(s) must be removed each turn. Two teams are competing head-to-head to keep their towers standing as long as possible. As one 5th grader this week put it, “This is really intense!”

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Woodland Hills (Waukee) 5th graders join in a rousing game of Musical Oxbows!  It’s like Musical Chairs, but in this version of the game, students become Topeka Shiners (native fish to Iowa) and swim around an oxbow while the music is playing. Ann encourages them to “summon their inner fish” while Liz runs the boombox.

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Once the music stops, find a spot in the oxbow, or you’re out!  The game gets a bit tougher as “situations” are drawn from the “situation jar” and the oxbow shrinks… it’s survival of the fittest!

Check out the 2015 Schedule of Events to see where we’re headed next. While our fall schedule is closed, we are currently accepting requests for second semester school visits, over the months of February – May. Learn more about our offerings on the Classroom Visits webpage, and then hop on over to Request a Visit!

Ann Staudt

August ILF Webinar: Cover Crops with Tom Kaspar

ILF’s August Webinar features none other than Tom Kaspar, Plant Physiologist at the USDA-ARS National Soil Tilth Laboratory in Ames, IA and USDA Collaborator/Professor with the Agronomy Department at Iowa State University.

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Tom Kaspar digs up some of the cover crop roots in his long-term research plots.

Tom discusses his research on Cover Crops in terms of their proven benefits, such as erosion control, soil health, and reduction in nitrate loss.  But Tom also reminds us that we have just scratched the surface of our knowledge, pondering the possibilities of better adapted species, further experimenting with mixtures, and a better understanding of the precise effects upon yield.

Watch this webinar (and catch up on ones you’ve missed here.)

You can also read about getting started with cover crops and if you missed Tom Kaspar on the Conservation Chat, listen here!

-Ben Schrag

Grow Vegetables? Try integrating cover crops!

If you raise vegetables full time or just for fun, check out this great resource publication:

Cover Crops in Vegetable Production Systems

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Dr. Ajay Nair examines a cover crop root mass at a horticulture cover crop field day.

Cover crops are gaining importance in vegetable production systems. Cover crops reduce soil erosion, minimize nutrient leaching, suppress weed emergence, and build soil quality and organic matter. Cover crops are now being widely used by conventional, sustainable, and organic vegetable growers, to accomplish these tasks and also to maintain high soil fertility. This publication defines various cover crops and their benefits and specifically highlights examples of vegetable crop rotations that could be easily adopted/modified by growers depending upon their production systems.

Cover Crop Horticulture Rotation

Included are five example rotations for how to integrate cover crops in your vegetable cropping system.

For more information and questions about this publication or integrating cover crops into your vegetable rotation, contact the authors:

Dr. Ajay Nair, Assistant Professor and Iowa State Vegetable Extension Specialist

Dr. Tom Kaspar, Plant Physiologist at the USDA-ARS National Soil Tilth Laboratory

Dr. Gail Nonnecke, University Professor and  Morrill Professor, Department of Horticulture at Iowa State

Liz Juchems