The Fabulous World of Wetlands

Today’s guest blog post is provided by Joshua Harms, part of the Iowa AmeriCorps 4-H Outreach program, serving with Water Rocks! in 2018-19.

As a continuation from last month’s blog, I will be explaining another one of our great modules with Water Rocks!. Our presentation over wetlands has many interesting and important facts along with a few games as well. The module is meant to feel like the students are on a game show and we are their game show hosts. This presentation, like all the others, has been fine-tuned by our team to make it run super smoothly in the classroom with elementary and middle school students.

Our Fabulous World of Wetlands module starts with an audio “field trip,” where we have all the students close their eyes as we play some sounds from out in nature. We then ask them what different sounds they heard. After they have given us some of the different creatures they heard, we ask them where they think the sounds were recorded, hoping that they eventually answer wetlands. We then ask them to answer a trivia/evaluation question to establish their baseline understanding of the subject.

We then continue into our first game, a guessing game in which the students have to try and guess what the three main characteristics of wetlands are (hydric soils, presence of water, and water-loving plants). After the students eventually get all three things, sometimes with the help of some hints, we move on to show them three objects that represent the three main jobs of wetlands. The first object is a coffee filter and we explain that wetlands filter the water and leave it cleaner after it passes through the wetlands. The second object is a sponge and we explain that hydric soils store water like a sponge would if it was dropped in a bucket of water. The third and final object is a small house, which we use to explain that wetlands are a habitat to many different creatures. After we get done explaining the three jobs we have the students repeat them to lock the knowledge into their brains.

We then transition to talking about some certain creatures that rely on wetlands, particularly migratory birds and butterflies. We ask the students to think about if we were all to get on a bus and take a long journey down to Texas, what would be some reasons that we would stop on our journey? They usually answer with things such as food, water, bathroom, sleep, etc. We then explain that for those same reasons that we would stop, birds and butterflies need those same things and they stop at wetlands to take care of all of it along their journeys. This leads us into the next game which is Habitat Hopscotch. This game involves different states that are on the birds’ and butterflies’ migratory paths, as pictured above. But there is a twist—there are some situations that remove wetlands in certain states, which means we remove that state from the game. We then go through all the situations one-by-one, and by the end of the game, there are only three of the original ten squares remaining. That means there are not many wetlands left for the birds and butterflies to stop at!

After the completion of Habitat Hopscotch, we show two maps of Iowa, one of what Iowa looked like 200 years ago and the other one of present day Iowa. What we are showing the students is that our state used to be almost all prairie and wetlands but now the state is mostly covered by corn and beans. We then let them know that 90% of our original wetlands have been converted into other things. We also tell them that 99.9% of our state’s prairie land has also been converted. But it’s not all bad news—there has been good work with farmers to restore both prairie and wetlands on part of their land, which is great for all the creatures that call wetlands home.

This leads us into our game of Wetlands Bingo, which allows the students to see many more of the creatures that live in wetlands. After each wetland bingo, we ask that student a trivia question that gives them a chance to win a prize. When we have had multiple winners, we then finish with the same trivia/evaluation question that we did near the beginning of our presentation. We also leave each classroom teacher with a set of Wetland Bingo cards, so they and their students can continue learning about the Fabulous World of Wetlands and all the amazing creatures that call wetlands their home!

Joshua Harms

Apply today for Water Resources Summer Internship!

Have an interest in the environment, conservation, and agriculture, particularly water and soil quality?  We are seeking undergraduate student interns for our summer 2019 Water Resources Internship Program who are self-motivated, detail-oriented, strong communicators, enthusiastic, and have a sense of fun! Interns’ time will be split between outreach and research, all centered around environmental issues and challenges in Iowa.

Visit the 2019 Water Resources Internship Program webpage for additional information and complete application instructions. Applications close Thursday, January 31 at 5:00pm.

Summer interns will have the opportunity to:

  • Work with two exciting Iowa State University education and outreach programs:
  • Develop strong oral communication skills as you help children and adults better understand environmental and agricultural issues
  • Travel throughout the state of Iowa with the fleet of three Conservation Station trailers
  • Contribute to water and soil quality research projects in ISU’s Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
  • Gain technical skills related to agricultural and biosystems engineering, environmental science, soil health and water quality through both field and lab research

Highlights from the 2018 Water Resources Internship Program. 

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How to Apply:
Required application materials include:

  • PDF Resume (Be sure to include your GPA, major, and previous work experience)
  • PDF Cover Letter (Tell us what interests you about this internship and why you’d be a great fit!)

Internship application deadline is 5:00pm on Thursday, January 31, 2019. Please submit your complete application package to Liz Juchems via email – ejuchems@iastate.edu.

Liz Juchems

Give a Little, Learn a Lot

As the end of the year approaches, please consider a tax-deductible gift to Water Rocks!, investing in the next generation of Iowans, inspiring them to protect our state’s water, land, and wildlife!

Water Rocks! and the Conservation Stations have fanned out across Iowa for years to raise awareness for water quality and conservation issues among growing audiences. We’ve won awards and gotten lots of cheers, but as they say, that won’t put dinner on the table—or clean water in your glass.

While our music video “It’s All About That Bog” delivers a message about wetlands, for today “It’s All About That Green”—the green that we need to keep the programming moving forward. We’ve got a top-notch education program, and we need your help now more than ever before.

Please help us continue to bring Iowans from every walk of life these important messages about the water and natural resources we all share.

What makes Water Rocks! and the Conservation Stations work:

  • Hands-on demonstrations and practical educational sessions
  • Using music and the arts to attract, engage and teach audiences of every age and background
  • Combining science, research and fun to build understanding of land management, biodiversity, watershed dynamics, conservation challenges and solutions
  • Financially attainable by schools with shrinking or nonexistent budgets—enabled by financial support to Water Rocks! from donors across the state

Please “Give a Little”, to help bring high-quality conservation outreach and education programming to schools, outdoor classrooms, fairs and community events so the next generation of Iowans can “Learn a Lot.”

To contribute, visit the Iowa State University Foundation’s Water Rocks! gift portal, www.foundation.iastate.edu/waterrocks.  Thank you so much for your consideration!

Water Rocks! Conservation Education Programs Reach 36,000 Iowan Students

The annual report from Water Rocks! highlights increases in comprehension scores and curriculum adoption of watershed concepts across the state

Water Rocks! recently published its 2017-18 Annual Evaluation Report, detailing the impacts Water Rocks! visits had on students, teachers, and conservation education during the 2017-18 academic year. Reaching a cross section of Iowa’s youth, Water Rocks! delivered classroom presentations, outdoor classroom programs, and school assemblies to audiences comprised of more than 36,000 students. Feedback and evaluation metrics gathered during the year show significant increases in student comprehension as well as more adoption of conservation topics in classroom discussion both before and after program visits.

Water Rocks! delivers lessons about watersheds, wetlands, soil, pollinators and biodiversity to students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Within each 45- to 50-minute program, Water Rocks! strives to achieve its educational goals through a combination of hands-on games, interactive activities, music, plays, discussion and energetic presenters.

“Together with Iowa’s classroom teachers, Water Rocks! is helping students increase environmental literacy on timely natural resources issues, with high-energy programs that make a lasting impact,” said Ann Staudt, Water Rocks! director. “In compiling the annual report, we were also delighted to note that more teachers reported introducing students to watersheds and water quality topics before our visits and indicated desire to promote follow-up discussion and activities with their students.”


Key findings in the report include:

  • Presented in 180 schools and 12 outdoor classrooms, reaching over 36,000 students
  • Watershed identification comprehension increased from 36 percent before, to 95 percent after, the lesson
  • Some 88 percent of teachers planned to hold follow-up discussions with students covering the Water Rocks! materials and information

The report also includes the results of new evaluations conducted with peer helpers, students selected by school principals to assist in Water Rocks! assembly productions. These students were asked a more detailed set of before and after questions. The results reinforced the general trends in comprehension noted in the large groups, but also provide new insights which may help enrich future programming.

“Through Water Rocks! lessons, it is evident that the peer helpers are learning much more than just vocabulary, they are learning about the interconnectedness of natural resources and possible solutions to the environmental challenges in the world around them,” noted Staudt.

To learn read the report or to view comments from students and teachers, please visit https://www.waterrocks.org/201718-water-rocks-evaluation-report.

Art and Science create Vision for Future in Conservation Station

The Big Conservation Station trailer is trailblazing to county fairs across the state with a brand new, interactive display presenting a simple question: “What is your hope for Iowa?” Inside the Conservation Station’s learning lab are new mixed media murals showcasing the past, present and future of Iowa’s natural resources. Conservation Station visitors will have the opportunity to engage in discussion and artistic expression of their own – each fairgoer is invited to share their own #HopeForIowa.

“I am hoping to evoke an emotional response to the land, by depicting not a particular place, but ‘every place,’ so each person can relate to it,” explains artist Cecelia Comito of Artworks Studio in Carroll.

Comito collaborated with Ann Staudt, Water Rocks! science director, to create the original mixed media artwork for the Conservation Station trailer, representing an artistic vision that reflects the past, present and the future of our state. The artwork panels illustrate advances in conservation efforts over time, and the potential possibilities as farmers and other Iowans continue to implement effective land management practices to build soil health, improve water quality and increase wildlife habitat.

All the artwork was done on large canvasses at Artworks Studio. Each mixed media panel was built up with extensive layers of torn and cut paper, including such materials as stained and textured papers, pages from recipe books, story books, road maps, plat maps and even sewing patterns. Fine details were added through image transfer, paints, gelatos, watercolor pencils and pastels. Click through the slideshow below for a behind-the-scenes look at how the artwork came together. The finished pieces were imaged on a large scanner and then digitized in order to produce them large enough to place on the walls of the trailer.

“Farming practices have evolved over time, and not always in ways that have been positive for the ecosystem,” explained Staudt. “This new interactive art display will help people envision what’s possible for Iowa’s future and maybe inspire us to see what is possible.”

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In addition to the new artwork, Conservation Station team members employ perennial favorite interactive games and activities including The Watershed Game, The Poo Toss and the Rainfall Simulator to engage fairgoers of all ages.

Upcoming Big Conservation Station Trailer Appearances:
July 17                  Public Radio On Tap, Iowa City
July 18                  Polk Co. Fair
July 19                  Jones Co. Fair
July 20                  Tama Co. Fair
July 21                  Poweshiek Co. Fair
July 25                  Wayne Co. Fair
July 26                  Monroe Co. Fair
July 27                  Fayette Co. Fair
July 28                  Independence Farmers Market
Aug. 4                    Lakes Area Farmers Market, Spirit Lake
Sept. 2                  Glow Wild at Jester Park, Granger

Ann Staudt

Welcome back, Megan!

Hello! My name is Megan Koppenhafer. You may recognize me as the teacher from the Water Rocks! music video “Please the Bees,” and I am excited to officially rejoin the Water Rocks! team as an AmeriCorps service member!

I am a recent graduate of Iowa State University with degrees in Environmental Science and Community and Regional Planning. I grew up on a farm outside Williamsburg, IA.  I developed my passion for sustainable agriculture and living through my years as a camp counselor in Iowa City. At this camp, I learned how to teach kids about being in nature and truly valuing all that the earth has to offer us.

From these experiences, I knew that education was the way I wanted to make a difference in conservation. Amid this realization, I made a comment to my mom about wanting to be a ‘Bill Nye the Science Guy’ for environmental science. She encouraged me to keep that in the back of my head but focus on some more practical jobs first.

When I saw the Water Rocks! summer internship opportunity come to my inbox during my sophomore year of college, I quickly applied and watched as many of the Water Rocks! music videos as I could. I excitedly showed my mom and told her I had found my chance! After my first summer, I loved it so much I came back a second time ……and now for a third time as an AmeriCorps service member!

This time around you’ll see a lot more of me in assemblies and classroom visits. I will also be working on a project with some of our extension and county conservation partners to bring Water Rocks! day camps to different counties across the state.

I look forward to seeing some of you at assemblies or classroom visits or possibly camps and can’t wait to groove with everyone!

Megan Koppenhafer

Liz Juchems Recognized with P&S Outstanding New Professional Award

Iowa Learning Farms and Water Rocks! Events Coordinator Elizabeth Juchems was honored at an awards ceremony this week as a recipient of the Professional & Scientific Outstanding New Professional Award. This award recognizes those P&S employees who have demonstrated innovative, creative or original ways in accomplishing job responsibilities, who have established a pattern of reliability and responsibility in performing job duties and who have made an effort toward continual personal and professional development.

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Here are a few excepts from Liz’s award nomination:

“Elizabeth Juchems excels in her role as Extension Program Specialist with the Iowa Learning Farms and Water Rocks! outreach programs! Liz handles the coordination of ALL event details for 30+ farmer field days and 200+ community/youth outreach events each year, reaching 20,000+ people annually —50% increase since Liz’s first year! As one co-worker said, “Liz is a multi-tasking, scheduling, and organizational wizard.” Liz personally participates in 60+ outreach events each year, and has grown into one of our team’s key educators on conservation, soil, water, and natural resources issues with both farmers and youth audiences. Further, Liz serves as field coordinator for four cover crop research projects amounting to an additional $600,000 in grant funding for our programs.”

“Liz’s pattern of reliability and responsibility in performing job duties comes down to one key thing: Liz is highly organized. Her capacity for keeping everything in its place and attending to all the fine details enhances her productivity as well as keeps the ILF/WR! team on target.”

21992912_10155898573951155_5543714469147694128_oCongratulations, Liz! We appreciate you as a member of our team and are excited for both your past and future accomplishments that help our programs succeed.

Julie Whitson