Why Field Days Matter

Through our evaluation work since 2004, we have found that there is a relationship between attending field days, adopting conservation practices and influencing other farmers. We call this our Field Day Success Loop.

SuccessLoop

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Iowa Learning Farms has learned the importance of taking a closer look at who among field day attendees is networking with other farmers and discussing conservation ideas. Since 2013, the number of farmers who attended field days and networked conservation ideas with other farmers continues to increase – from 65% in 2013 to 68% in 2017.

A follow-up question on our year-end evaluation asks “How successful were you?,” and asks if farmers were able to influence zero, one, or two or more people when they networked conservation ideas with other farmers. Of those attendees who networked in 2017, 60% reported that they were successful in influencing at least one other person.

We know that some farmers network about conservation ideas and others do not. Certain factors make respondents more likely to connect with others and network about conservation ideas. Those respondents who have more years of experience with cover crops and those who attend more field days are more likely to report networking conservation ideas. Particularly in 2017, respondents who farm a larger number of total acres were more likely to report networking conservation ideas.

Networking

Multiplier Effect

Field day attendees are networking with their peers, influencing farmers who did not attend the field day, thus creating a multiplier effect. In 2017, 68% of farmers who attended an ILF event said that they networked. As a result, farmers are extending influence to 55% more farmers than attended the event. That’s a $1.55 value for every dollar invested in ILF. Field days make sense!

NetworkingInvestment
Keep up to date on upcoming field days in your area by following us on Facebook and Twitter or visiting our events page.

Hope to see you at a 2018 Field Day!

Liz Juchems

 

Grass species most popular cover crops among Iowa farmers

Grasses, brassicas, legumes – oh my! With so many cover crop species to choose from, how does one decide?

One way is to look at what the producers in your area are using and observe how well those species will help reach the goals you have for your land. Here are some examples of cover crops by group:

  • Grasses = cereal rye, oats, wheat, triticale, barley
  • Brassicas (plants producing a tap root) = radishes, rapeseed, mustards
  • Legumes = red clover, crimson clover, hairy vetch, peas

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To help identify what cover crop species are being used across the state, we asked our 2017 field day attendees.  Responses to our 2017 Field Day Evaluation Report are similar to our conclusions of what works best in our cover crop species research projects. Grasses are the best choice of cover crops for a corn/soybean system. Cereal rye was the mostly widely used species, with 85% respondents listing it as what they seeded in 2017. Reported brassica and legume usage is down overall compared to 2016 data.

Cover Crop Species

For those looking to get started with cover crops, we recommend the following:

Oats Before Corn & Cereal Rye Before Soybeans

These cover crop species are relatively inexpensive, readily available and easy to establish. Oats will winter kill whereas cereal rye is winter hardy and requires spring termination. That is why we recommend using it before soybeans to provide the best opportunity for first time cover croppers to learn how to manage the cereal rye and minimize negative yield impacts.

Liz Juchems

Evaluation key to effective field days

You planned your event – lined up the space, speakers, meal – and had a great turnout. Congratulations! You’re done now right?

Not quite…

How do you know if your event was effective in meeting your outreach goals? What could have been done differently to improve the effectiveness? Asking for attendee feedback is a useful evaluation tool that can be used to make decisions on what worked well and what doesn’t. In addition to self-reflection on the event, asking for attendee feedback is one of Iowa Learning Farms’ key tools for planning and holding well attended and effective events.

DSC_1312Through our two-week follow up evaluation we gather feedback on the effectiveness of the field day to help us improve future events. Using a five point scale, attendees are asked to rate the overall quality of the field day, effectiveness of expert presentations (ILF, ISU Extension and Outreach, NRCS, PFI, etc.), and effectiveness of farmer presentations.

All three categories saw improvement over 2016 numbers. The effectiveness of expert presentations saw a 10% increase over last year in the people who considered it excellent and the overall quality of the field day or workshop metric saw an 8% increase over last year in the people who considered it excellent.

Effectiveness

In addition to the information above in our Year End Evaluation Report, we also compiled our Individual Field Day Report. This report breaks out the evaluation responses by event, as well as how far attendees traveled to attend the event to help with field day promotion efforts – see map below.

Summary of 15 16 and 17 Distance Traveled by Crop Dist

An example two-week evaluation is available in our Field Day Marketing Toolkit and we encourage you to modify it and use it for your own event.  We are currently revising the evaluation to add more specific questions aimed at improving program content and format. This will be included in the Toolkit update later this spring.

Stayed tuned for more highlights from our 2017 Evaluation Report and be sure to click subscribe and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Liz Juchems

Gathering everyone together to increase conservation efforts

Landowners have a great opportunity to shape how their land is managed. In Iowa, about 40% of agricultural land is owned by women.  It is crucial to have women represented at field days and workshops so they can make informed decisions in their operations and/or with their tenants. women attendees

For the past two years, 27% of Iowa Learning Farms attendees were women. From the 2017 demographic cards, 17% of all attendees who identified as farmers/operators or landowners were women; 40% of those who identified as “other” were women (government employees, agribusiness, students or educators). Since ILF first started hosting field days in 2004, the number of women attending field days has increased. More women are now serving as Extension Specialists, agronomists, and government employees and this is reflected in our data.

dsc_1789.jpgWomen continue to play an active role in the farming operation with 43% of women attendees describing themselves as active farmers/operators and 64% describe themselves as landowners. Nearly 60% reported owning more than three-quarters of their land. This finding is consistent with the trend of increasing numbers of acres owned by female landowners. It is encouraging to see these women taking an active role in the management of their land as both farmer/operator and/or landowner.

In 2018, ILF will continue to seek new ways to increase female attendance, especially female farmers/operators and landowners, at field days and workshops. Women indicated to us that they would prefer to attend events on Tuesday-Thursday either in the morning (41%) or afternoon (57%). This year we are planning to offer events at these times to see if we can increase the number of women attending our events. We also plan to partner with organizations that focus on women farmers/operators and landowners.

Stayed tuned for more highlights from our 2017 Evaluation Report and be sure to click subscribe and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Liz Juchems

Reaching out to farmers and landowners

In 2017, Iowa Learning Farms hosted 29 conservation field days and workshops across the state with the goal of reaching out to farmers/operators and landowners. Introduced this year was a new component of our evaluation process – the demographic card. The cards helped provide a snapshot of attendees in terms of their age, gender, role in agriculture and information about their farming operation. The cards also capture preferences on timing and topics of interest for future outreach events.

Midway through 2017, we started to use this information to help us plan better events for the second half of the year. We will continue to experiment with time of day and week for field days to see if we can’t get a better diversity of audience.  Total number of demographic cards collected in 2017 was 915.

Who attended ILF field days in 2017?

Eighty-three percent of the field day attendees identified themselves as either farmers/operators or landowners. Two percent of the attendees were new to farming and four percent would like to start farming. In 2018, we want to explore reaching out to those populations better.2017 ILF Evaluation Report_for blog_attendees

About half of respondents indicate they own over 75% of their land. However, when looking at respondents aged 50 and under, that changes dramatically to 57% of respondents reporting that they own 25% or less of their acres. Faced with many acres changing hands in the next five to ten years, it is important to continue to develop outreach materials and plan events accessible to both landowners and farmer/operators. To reach our goals of increasing conservation implementation, it will be a coordinated effort by both landowners and those who actively farm.

2017 ILF Evaluation Report_for blog-_ageThe average age of farmers/operators attending ILF field days was 55 years, which was slightly younger than the average age of a farmer in Iowa (57 years). This finding has been consistent in the four years that we have been tracking age information. The average age of landowners attending ILF field days was higher at 64 years.

In general, field day attendees indicated a preference for Wednesday field days that were held in the afternoon or after 5 pm.


What about younger farmers?

Seventeen percent of our field day attendees are 35 years or younger; 80% of attendees are men while 20% are women. On average, farmers in this age group farm 739 acres of row crop land (range of 40 – 3,500 acres) and own 25% of their farmland. Nearly 57% of respondents in this category reported that they did not own any of the acres that they currently farm.

Livestock is an early entry point for the next generation to begin or return to the farm. Nearly 60% of this group reported having livestock compared to 45% of respondents in all age groups who identified as farmer/landowner. These younger attendees indicated a preference for events held on Saturdays (48%) followed by Tuesday-Thursday (42%) after 5 pm (50%).

We in the process of updating the ILF Field Day Toolkit and add these findings to event planning best practices.

2017 ILF Evaluation Report_for blog-_younger

Stayed tuned for more highlights from our 2017 Evaluation Report and be sure to click subscribe and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Liz Juchems

Building A Culture of Conservation Since 2004

Iowa Learning Farms continues to build a Culture of Conservation as we bring together farmers, landowners, agribusiness, researchers and state and federal agency partners.

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In 2017, Iowa Learning Farms delivered or participated in 92 outreach events that reached a total of 7,372 people. Our staff, trailer fleet and partners across the state helped us reach new communities and participants as we continue to build a Culture of Conservation.

One of Iowa Learning Farms many strengths is our approach to evaluation. The process is five-fold to help us plan and deliver effective conservation education and outreach.

Here is a glimpse behind the curtain at our evaluation process:

  • Event Evaluations – completed by our team immediately following every event. These forms help us to understand the audience’s level of engagement, document the questions that were asked by participants and help us to improve future outreach activities by noting what went well and what could be improved.

The remaining evaluation process is specific for farmer outreach activities that we host:

  • Comment Cards – filled out by all participants in order to gain a better understanding of who they are and why they are there.
  • Demographic Cards – filled out by all participants and provide a snapshot of attendees in terms of their age, gender, role in agriculture and information about their farming operation. The cards also capture preferences on timing and topics of interest for future outreach events.
  • Follow-up Evaluations – mailed within three weeks of the event to participants (for those that happened before November 7). The questions focused on the clarity and accessibility of the information received and inquired whether participants planned to make any changes in their land management as a result of the event. The individual field day report is now available online.
  • January Evaluations – mailed to only farmers/operators and landowners. These questionnaires were sent in January 2018 to see if the participants had made the changes they said they were going to make in earlier evaluations.

Over the course of the next few weeks we will be highlighting findings from our 2017 Evaluation Report, so be sure to subscribe and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Liz Juchems

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Cover Crop Acres Grow But Rate of Growth Declines in 2017

According to the Iowa Learning Farms 2017 Field Day Evaluation Report, Iowa cover crop acres grew last year by approximately 22% to 760,000 total acres. While the positive growth with shrinking profit margins is notable, the rate of growth is ten percent less than the growth measured in 2016, and still well below the goal of 12.5 million acres of cover crops called for in Iowa’s Nutrient Reduction Strategy.

Cover Crop Acres 2017 (2)

Many of the new acres were planted by experienced cover crop farmers. The majority (69%) of respondents to Iowa Learning Farms’ year-end evaluation questionnaire started seeding cover crops at least three years ago. Only eleven percent of respondents reported implementing cover crops for the first time on their land last year. Those respondents with cover crops reported an average of 46% of their total row crop acres in cover crops—6% more than in 2016.

Cost Share Cover Crops 2017. (2)The overall percentage of farmers who are using cost share to seed cover crop acres has increased by seven percent over four years of Iowa Learning Farms evaluation data. Of the respondents seeding cover crops in 2017, 65% of them did so with the assistance of cost share.

Iowa Learning Farms sponsored 29 conservation field days and workshops in 2017 on cover crops, strip-tillage, saturated buffers, prairie strips and more. These events drew an attendance of 1,280 people, primarily farmers and landowners (89%). Twenty-seven percent of Iowa Learning Farms field day attendees were female.Eval Cover (2)

In January 2018, 580 farmers and landowners who attended Iowa Learning Farms field days were mailed an evaluation questionnaire to investigate whether they made changes to their farming practices. In a one-month period, 251 evaluation questionnaires were returned for a 42% response rate.

The Iowa Learning Farms 2017 Field Day Evaluation Report can be found at www.iowalearningfarms.org.

Established in 2004, Iowa Learning Farms is building a Culture of Conservation by encouraging adoption of conservation practices. Farmers, researchers and team members are working together to identify and implement the best management practices that improve water quality and soil health while remaining profitable. Partners of Iowa Learning Farms include the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Iowa Department of Natural Resources (USEPA section 319).

Liz Juchems