September 19 Webinar: Highlighting the Benefits of Conservation Planning

On Wednesday, September 19th at noon Kevin Kuhn, NRCS Resource Conservationist serving on the Ecological Services State Staff, will highlight the benefits of Conservation Planning for farmers and landowners.

Kuhn Cropped

Kevin Kuhn in a field with cereal rye.

Conservation Planning provides many benefits to the farmer operator, landowner and society through the identification of resource concerns and opportunities to implement practices like no-tillage, cover crops, waterways, saturated buffers, wildlife habitat and more. Kuhn has 30 years of experience working for NRCS assisting landowners with conservation on their farms. He will discuss how conservation planning optimizes the use of conservation practices, saves time and money, and improves water and soil quality.

“Conservation planning is about putting the right conservation system in place that meet the objectives of the landowner, the resource concerns of the specific tract of land, and minimizes offsite resource concerns,” commented Kuhn. “Conservation planning is time well spent.”

DATE: Wednesday, September 19
TIME: 12:00 p.m.
HOW TO PARTICIPATE: www.iowalearningfarms.org/page/webinars and click the link to join the webinar

Don’t miss this webinar! More information about this webinar is available at our website. If you can’t watch the webinar live, an archived version will be available on our website: https://www.iowalearningfarms.org/page/webinars.

Liz Juchems

Tea Bags Tell Story of Soil Health

Soil health is trending, there’s no doubt about that! But perhaps expensive soil tests aren’t your cup of tea.

Look no further than the Soil Decomposition Index: a simple, straightforward, citizen science approach to evaluating soil health that utilizes buried tea bags. Learn more about this novel approach to soil health from Dr. Marshall McDaniel, assistant professor of agronomy at Iowa State University, in his recent Iowa Learning Farms webinar titled Burying Tea to Dig Up Soil Health.

Microbes are the engines that drive the biology of our soils, especially the cycling of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. Under the umbrella of soil health, McDaniel points out that biological indicators are the most sensitive to changing management practices, so this tea bag concept is built upon evaluating one aspect of the biology going on right beneath our feet.

The tea serves as food for the smallest soil microorganisms, including bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi, that are able to squeeze through the tiny openings in the mesh tea bag. As the tea is consumed over time, the bags are dug up and weighed, providing an indication of the biological activity within the soil, particularly the decomposition activity of the smallest soil organisms.

In each field, McDaniel’s team is comparing two types of teas side-by-side: green tea, which simulates a high quality (low C:N) residue, and rooibos tea, which simulates a lower quality (high C:N, nitrogen-limited) residue. Based on how much of each tea is remaining, you can calculate a Soil Decomposition Index value.  Values range from 0 to 1, and the closer to 1, the healthier the soil is! Using two teas side-by-side lets you calculate a standardized Soil Decomposition Index value which accounts for temperature and soil moisture variability, as well as allowing results to be readily compared between different sites – so you can compare apples to apples.

Check out the full webinar, Burying Tea to Dig Up Soil Health, on the Iowa Learning Farms webinars page, to hear more details of this novel soil health test and preliminary results from on-farm studies evaluating the Soil Decomposition Index with cover crops.

For those active on Twitter, you can follow the McDaniel lab, @ Soil_Plant_IXNs, as they continue to evaluate this unique tea bag concept and many other aspects related to soil-plant interactions and agricultural sustainability.

Ann Staudt

August Webinar – Exploring Soil Health Through Tea Decomposition

On Wednesday, August 15th at noon Dr. Marshall McDaniel, assistant professor in soil-plant interactions at Iowa State University, will explore the decomposition of tea as a low-cost, scientifically-robust soil health indicator.

tea bag soil health studyThe term ‘Soil Health’ has recently become popular due, in large part, to the increased awareness of the importance of soil biology.  However, current biological soil health tests are expensive, highly variable, and difficult to interpret. Dr. McDaniel studies the relationship between soils and plants, and how this relationship is affected by management and the environment. The McDaniel Research Group’s ultimate goal is to understand what enhances soil-plant synergy, soil health, and agroecosystem sustainability.  One thrust of the research is using decomposition of tea bags as an inexpensive, yet scientifically-robust, indicator of soil health.

“Increasing soil health is not only good for the environment, but also for the bottom line through increased yields and decreased money spent on farm inputs,” commented Dr. McDaniel. “Citizen Science is a great way to educate and engage farmers in measuring their own soil health, and also help to inform professional scientists’ understanding of soil health.”

DATE: Wednesday, August 15
TIME: 12:00 p.m.
HOW TO PARTICIPATE: www.iowalearningfarms.org/page/webinars and click the link to join the webinar

Don’t miss this webinar! More information about this webinar is available at our website. If you can’t watch the webinar live, an archived version will be available on our website: https://www.iowalearningfarms.org/page/webinars.

Liz Juchems

Webinar Recap: Exploring Economic Benefits of Nitrogen Reductions in Iowa

On July 18th, Dr. Chuan Tang, postdoctoral research associate with the Center for Agriculture and Rural Development (CARD), joined us for our monthly webinar series to  discuss an ongoing project looking to provide economic valuation to the benefit of reducing nitrate in Iowa’s water.

The economic costs of nutrient pollution are relatively well known, but to develop good policy directed at reducing nutrients in our waters it is important to estimate the economic benefits too.  To help provide policy makers this important resource Dr. Tang worked along with Dr. Gabriel Lade, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at ISU, Dr. David Kaiser, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at ISU and the head of CARD’s Resource and Environmental Economics division, and Dr. Catherine Kling, former CARD Director to conduct this study. Together they divided the benefits into three categories:Slide9During his presentation Dr. Tang explored each of these categories more closely, but here are a few highlights –

  • About 90% of Iowans receive their water from a public water supply system that are monitored for nitrate levels. Of those systems – 55% rely on groundwater and 45% on surface water sources.
  • The remaining 10% use private wells. Private well users can contact their county health department to receive free test supplies to monitor the health of their water supply.
  • Lakes and other water bodies provide an estimated $30M each year in recreational benefits.
  • In addition to acute health impacts like Blue Baby Syndrome, health researchers are examining the chronic issue from long term exposure to high nitrate levels.

Be sure to watch the archive version of the webinar for more information and check out the related publication “Economic Benefits of Nitrogen Reductions in Iowa“.

Liz Juchems

Webinar Recap: Creating Conservation Legacies Through Farm Leases

Our June webinar featured Sara Berges, project coordinator with the Allamakee Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD). Her presentation focused on three main areas: How to include conservation in a lease, developing a Farm Legacy Report and cover crops with manure.

There is a real need to include conservation within a farm lease. Low commodity prices have led to more ground being converted into row crop agriculture according to Berges. Coupled with the fact that over 50% of Iowa ground is leased by absentee and non-farming landowners.

“We noticed that conservation is often left out of lease discussions. Leases tend to be fairly basic and cover mainly when rent is due and how much”    -Sara Berges

If you missed the webinar and would like more information on this topic, an archived version is available on our website: https://www.iowalearningfarms.org/page/webinars.

~Nathan

June 20 Webinar: Creating Conservation Legacies Through Farm Leases

Soymanure

Watch the Iowa Learning Farms webinar on June 20 at 12:00 p.m. Sara Berges, project coordinator with the Allamakee Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD)will share information about how to leave a conservation legacy by writing conservation into farm leases and how to incorporate cover crops on acres with manure application.

Berges is currently funded through a grant with the Leopold Center which allows her to work with landowners to add conservation in farm leases by updating conservation plans. As an extension of this work, she helps producers write Legacy Reports that document their conservation efforts and goals for their land. Another part of the project involves helping producers figure out how to include cover crops on acres that have manure application.

“Conservation is often left out of lease discussions, but it is vital for ensuring that the land is able to be farmed for years to come,” Berges commented. “I want people to look outside the conservation box, start with a conversation, and brainstorm about what can work and why.”

DATE: Wednesday, June 20, 2018
TIME: 12:00 p.m.
HOW TO PARTICIPATE: Log on as a guest shortly before 12:00 p.m.:
https://connect.extension.iastate.edu/ilf/

Don’t miss this webinar! More information about this webinar is available at our website. If you can’t watch the webinar live, an archived version will be available on our website: https://www.iowalearningfarms.org/page/webinars.

Learn How to Add Cover Crops to Your Farm Lease: Watch the Webinar on May 16

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Watch the Iowa Learning Farms webinar on May 16 at 12:00 p.m. to learn more about how cover crops can be incorporated into a farm lease arrangement. Cover crops are an important tool to help reduce soil erosion and nutrient losses while also improving soil health.

On rented land, adding a conservation practice like cover crops involves the cooperation of both the landowner and tenant. Common questions arise in this situation, including who pays for the practice, how the agreement should be documented and long-term benefits to consider.

Charles Brown, Farm Management Specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, will share best practices for adding cover crops to a farm lease arrangement. Don’t miss it!

DATE: Wednesday, May 16, 2018
TIME: 12:00 p.m.
HOW TO PARTICIPATE: Log on as a guest shortly before 12:00 p.m.:
https://connect.extension.iastate.edu/ilf/

More information about this webinar is available at our website. If you can’t watch the webinar live, an archived version will be available on our website: https://www.iowalearningfarms.org/page/webinars.

Julie Winter