Juchems Receives Outstanding New Professional Award at ISU

It’s May and that means it is American Wetlands Month. Normally, I would want to try to make my argument once again about how landowners should consider giving wetlands a second look on their land. Wetlands are a key component to Iowa’s Nutrient Reduction Strategy (learn more in Jake Hansen’s blog post titled Iowa CREP Wetlands) and often when farmed aren’t profitable (Should prairie potholes and other wet areas be farmed?). I know there is a history between landowners, wetlands and government regulation that sticks in many craws. But if we care about a sustainable and healthy Iowa, we need to rethink those issues going forward. Wetlands have important jobs to do in Iowa.

Instead of writing that column, I am dedicating this space to Iowa Learning Farms staff member, Liz Juchems, for recently receiving an Iowa State University Professional and Scientific Outstanding New Professional Award. This award reflects Liz’s commitment to Iowa State, her professional reputation and her esteem among her peers.

I have known Liz since she began working for the Iowa Learning Farms in 2008 as a student hourly employee while a freshman at ISU, and have been fortunate to work with her as our events coordinator since 2013. If you have been to any ILF field days over the last four years, you have Liz to thank for their quality and effectiveness.

Liz joined the team at a time when the ILF and Water Rocks! programs were starting to see substantial growth. Liz assumed not only the responsibility for coordinating farmer field days, but also coordinating all incoming requests for Iowa Learning Farms/Water Rocks! community outreach events (school visits, camps, youth outdoor classrooms, farmers markets, festivals and more) that are received annually – no small task with hundreds of event requests each year.

Over the last four years, the Iowa Learning Farms and Water Rocks! programs have grown significantly and have become widely recognized flagship conservation programs across Iowa. This is due in large part to Liz’s tremendous ability to keep track of details and ensure positive, clear communication internally and externally. We now average 30+ field days and 200+ outreach events each year, reaching 20,000+ people each year in quality educational encounters across Iowa!

With Iowa Learning Farms, Liz has also been instrumental in taking on a leadership role with field research/demonstrations, data collection, communications and outreach delivery. Since her hiring in 2013, the field research/demonstration arm of the Iowa Learning Farms has seen significant expansion and diversification, thanks in large part to being awarded multiple new research/demonstration grants. Each of these funded proposals involved the establishment of different cover crop trials across Iowa, collectively adding 20 new field research/demonstration sites statewide. Liz took the reigns as the farmer liaison, coordinating all project details with participating farmer-partners and research farm staff, as well as coordinating field data collection efforts with Iowa Learning Farms staff and student interns, training her co-workers on the appropriate protocols to follow both in the field and in the lab to ensure successful data collection.

However, data collection is just one portion of the job –another major component is how that content is delivered to the general public, making often complex science, social science and economic data accessible to farmers, other conservation stakeholders and youth across the state. A good example of her work is the ILF publication series titled Talking With Your Tenant that offers talking points and relevant research findings about a number of different conservation practices. Liz has grown into the role of being one of our team’s key educators on conservation issues in the state of Iowa.

For these and so many other reasons, Liz is more than deserving of this prestigious university honor. Quite simply, she is excellent! We are grateful to have her as a member of our team. Congratulations, Liz!

Jacqueline Comito

Working Together to Educate Youth in Dubuque

A few weeks back, the 4th and 5th students at St. Anthony and Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Schools in Dubuque were treated to high energy, highly interactive presentations from Water Rocks! … but these presentations were particularly special in that they featured a couple of local rock stars in the conservation world!

The Back Story:
As our Water Rocks! visit to St. Anthony & OLG was approaching, I realized it was going to be a pretty tight week for our small staff, and I’d likely be handling the event solo. However, situations like this also present the opportunity to partner with other conservation stakeholders across the state, and even better when it’s someone that’s already been trained on Water Rocks! materials.

Bev Wagner, with the Dubuque Metropolitan Area Solid Waste Agency, has participated in multiple Water Rocks! workshops in the past, including the Water Rocks! Summit, so she has been trained on a variety of the unique hands-on games and activities that we utilize in the classroom. Knowing I was headed to Dubuque, I knew exactly who to call upon!

I connected with Bev right away to see if she might be available to help out and co-present with me, and within a matter of minutes, she responded, “I am available the whole day and would love to help out.” With a smiley face. :)

A few days in advance of my trip to Dubuque, Bev contacted me and asked if her student helper, Ruth, an education student at Loras College, could also come and help out. YES, absolutely!

Fast Forward to Game Day:
Bev, Ruth and I met 30 minutes ahead of time, getting everything loaded into the classroom, set up for the interactive presentation, and we quickly talked through the content. Our topic of the day was The Wonderful World of Wetlands (read more about it in our earlier blog post Wetlands Outreach: Tools of the Trade). The first class of the day, I took the lead in presenting; Bev and Ruth observed while also actively assisting with handing out materials to the students, awarding prizes, etc.

With one class under our belts, Bev and Ruth were both feeling more comfortable with the content, so from that point forward, we tag-teamed the entire 50-minute presentation. We started off with an audio listening tour of wetlands, describing the creatures that live there and what the environment might look like. Ruth showed the class an image of wetlands as we connected that with the listening field trip the students had just gone on. Bev guided the students in talking through all of the different names that wetlands go by, calling on students to share one of the names and then saying it out loud together as a class.

We then jumped in with the characteristics that make wetlands unique (hydric soils, presence of water, and vegetation). That was followed by the 3 jobs that wetlands perform – there were 3 of us, so each one took a job (and its corresponding prop) and explained it to the class!  I started off with a filter (water purification), Ruth followed with a sponge (water storage), and Bev concluded with the house (representing habitat).

Bev and Ruth led the classes in discussing the amazing diversity of plants, animals, microorganisms, and other life found in wetlands – as much biodiversity in Iowa’s wetlands as is found in the Amazon rainforest!  We talked about how wetlands are especially important to migratory creatures – birds and butterflies.

Students then got the opportunity to summon their inner birds for an intense game of Habitat Hopscotch!  Bev was the keeper of the (infamous) “situation jar” which housed different situations that impacted wetlands, while Ruth and I acted as the “bird police,” ensuring that students were landing in the correct squares and sending them to bird prison when they stepped out. Being a Catholic school, one of the 4th grade students asked if instead of bird prison, could we call it “bird heaven”? Priceless!

After 5-6 rousing rounds of Habitat Hopscotch, it was pretty clear that the loss of wetlands has a serious impact on migratory birds. Iowa has lost ~90% of its original wetlands, so that means protecting the remaining 10% of wetlands is critically important!

One 5th grade student responded, “I think we all need to #(HASHTAG) Save The Wetlands!

It was then time to move on to our other big game, Wetlands BINGO!  Again, Bev and Ruth were awesome helpers. Bev was our official BINGO caller, while Ruth and I called out the names of corresponding creatures found in wetlands. Each one of us chipped in with fun facts about the different creatures, as well as sharing which ones were our favorites. When a student got a BINGO, we worked together to come up with a simple trivia question to test their knowledge before awarding a prize from our treasure chest. The 50 minutes with each class passes by so quickly with all the games and hands-on activities involved!

By the end of the day, we had presented to five different classes of students, and I’m pleased to say that not only did the students have a whole lot of fun, they also learned a whole lot about wetland ecosystems and their importance on our landscape. Further, this school visit was a great success in terms of the collaborative teaching effort – a win-win all around!  Bev and Ruth were awesome to work with, and it was fantastic to have local conservation personnel involved helping out with Water Rocks! as well as connecting with the local teachers and students. We look forward to more opportunities like this in the future. All in all, it was a great success —  one of those days when you go home really feeling like you made a difference. And that’s a great feeling.

Ann Staudt

Water Rocks! Assemblies are Rockin’!

What do singing, dancing, dog poop, water quality, full audience participation, and a big blue Snuggie all have in common? You’ll get all of these things and more with the brand new Water Rocks! Assemblies!

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This fall Water Rocks! rolled out a creative and exciting endeavor called Water Rocks! Assemblies, using music to teach the science of water quality for kindergartners through 8th grade across the state. The mission of Water Rocks! Assemblies is to educate, challenge, and inspire young people towards a greater appreciation of our water resources. Water Rocks! continues to reach students through its popular interactive classroom visits, but the Water Rocks! Assemblies are unique in that multiple classes, even multiple grades, with hundreds of students, can be reached at one time! Since Water Rocks! took their new show on the road in September, thousands of students across Iowa, along with their teachers, have rocked out with Water Rocks! Assemblies.

During the Assemblies, students learn about watersheds, natural resources, conservation, and land use. The teaching is done through music, dance, theater, games, and interactive lessons. This innovative approach of infusing science and music makes learning fun, and helps students commit valuable information to memory.


A teacher at Beaver Creek Elementary in Johnston said, “The team made the water facts exciting, fun, and informative. I believe my students will remember quite a few of the presented concepts. This was a great experience for my students!”

The Assemblies encourage students to participate by singing, dancing, performing in a play, and answering questions. Catchy Water Rocks! songs like “We all Live in a Watershed,” “What’s in Your Water?,” “Scoop That Poop” and “The Watershed Rap” bring students and teachers to their feet to sing and dance. Teachers are happy to see their students have such a great time while learning.

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A teacher from Turkey Valley Elementary school in Jackson Junction told us, “Bringing music into the presentation had students saying they couldn’t get the tune out of their heads – a good thing!”

Students in 4th-8th grades are entertained by an activity called “Watershed Broadway.” Peer helpers from the school perform in a play that illustrates how various pollutants move from our land to waterways in the Mississippi River Watershed, eventually making their way to the Gulf of Mexico. A Water Rocks! team member donning a big blue Snuggie plays the part of a raindrop who has just fallen out of the sky, and has to travel to the river. Along the way the raindrop meets some friends who join her on the journey to the river. These friends are pollutants such as garbage, sediment, fertilizer, pesticide, oil, and dog poop. Their journey to the river culminates with a cannonball into the river, in which the audience gets to see how pollution affects our waterways.

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Students in kindergarten – 3rd grades learn about harmful water pollutants by playing a gameshow-style game called “Clean River, Dirty River.” In the game, students are selected from the audience to come to the front. They are each given a picture of an item that can be found in a clean river or a dirty river. One at a time, they are asked to place their item on either the “Clean River” poster or the “Dirty River” poster. It serves as a great visual for younger students to see how pollution impacts our rivers!

Peer helpers are an integral part of the assemblies. Peer helpers are students identified as leaders by the faculty and staff at the school. The helpers sing, dance, and perform alongside Water Rocks! staff. They also encourage the audience to participate in the songs and activities. If possible, high school students are used as peer helpers, which is always a big hit with younger students.

A high school peer helper from Turkey Valley said, “I had an amazing time working with you guys! I learned things about water and watersheds that I didn’t even know. A little girl that told me it was the greatest day ever, and she was so happy that she got to dance with high schoolers. It was the cutest thing ever. Thank you guys for coming and letting us participate in the assembly. We all had a great time, and so did all the students that we talked to! Thanks so much!”

The Assemblies were created keeping Next Generation Science Standards in mind, so that teachers can coordinate classroom lessons with the information presented in the assembly. After each Assembly, teachers are given a packet of follow-up resources that contain workbooks, enhanced learning activities, DVDs, CDs with award-winning Water Rocks! music, and more.

Would you like to bring a Water Rocks! Assembly to your local school? Sponsorship opportunities are available — this is a particularly unique opportunity for Soil and Water Conservation Districts, local businesses, and individuals to show your support for conservation and natural resources education! Water quality matters to us all! Contact Jacqueline Comito at 515-296-0081 or jcomito@iastate.edu to discuss sponsorship to reserve a School Assembly in your local district. Spots are filing quickly for spring, so act today!

Jenn Riggs

Join us Nov. 1-2 for Water Rocks! Multi-State Youth Education Summit

Our next Water Rocks! Summit is just around the corner on Nov. 1-2, and this time around, we’ll be bringing together youth educators from across the North Central region! Read on for more information about this great professional development opportunity…

novembersummitgraphic-ilfblogWho can attend the Water Rocks! Multi-State Youth Education Summit?
4-H and extension educators, SWCD youth outreach coordinators, watershed coordinators, naturalists, municipal/public works education personnel, scientists who frequently conduct youth outreach in the classroom, and STEM coordinators are all welcome — anyone who is involved with youth education outside of the traditional classroom setting!  We will be bringing folks together not just from the state of Iowa, but also extension educators from land grant universities in several surrounding states from across the North Central region.

TEACHERS: Visit the Water Rocks! website to learn more about our Teacher Summits, offered during the summer, which are designed exclusively for you.

What is the Water Rocks! Summit all about?
This professional development workshop offers training on a multitude of interactive and hands-on educational lessons covering water, soil, agriculture, environmental science, and more. The November Water Rocks! Summit will cover a wide variety of topics including the water cycle, watersheds, connectedness of agriculture and the environment in Iowa, agricultural management practices, wetlands, biodiversity, and more. Music, videos, technology, and super fun hands-on activities will be woven throughout!

How much does it cost?
The full cost of the November Summit is $800, which includes the WR! activity kit ($800+ of materials), plus lunch and snacks during the day. Financial assistance is available to qualified individuals/organizations.

What’s included in the WR! activity kit?
The Water Rocks! activity kit features numerous original, interactive educational modules that Water Rocks! has developed to help teach classroom lessons on water, soil, agriculture, environmental science, and more. It’s chock full of original hands-on learning activities and games (We All Live in a Watershed, Habitat Hopscotch, Wetlands BINGO, Biodiversity JENGA, Dig Into Soil, What’s In Your (Storm)water?, and more) that can be used time and time again with Grades K-12.

There are several people from our county/organization that would like to attend. Can we all come to the Summit? Do we each have to buy our own activity kit?
Multiple individuals from the same county office or local organization are encouraged to attend the Water Rocks! Summit together (up to 3 people on a team); please apply together so we know you are a team. In this case, only one shared Water Rocks! activity kit would be required.

Ready to apply?
Space is limited, so apply right away!  Financial assistance is available to qualified individuals/organizations; apply by October 12, 2016 to be considered for scholarship assistance.

Ann Staudt

This cooperative project has been funded by the North Central Region Water Network. Partners of Water Rocks! include Iowa Department of Natural Resources (United States Environmental Protection Agency/Section 319 of Clean Water Act), Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Iowa Water Center, Iowa Learning Farms, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, and personal gifts of support.

Reflections on Water Rocks! over the years

This is our our final intern guest blog post for the summer! Noah Stevens is entering his senior year at Ames High School, where he is actively involved in track, cross country, and the performing arts. He has helped out with numerous Water Rocks! video productions over the years, and this summer participated in our high school internship program.

I’ve been involved with the Water Rocks! program since its origin back in 2012, and I must say, it has been fun to watch it progress in its success. From watching myself in the first Water Rocks! music video on the Water Rocks! website to being present at the Capitol building when the program was awarded with the Iowa Environmental Excellence Award for the State of Iowa, I have felt very privileged to be a part of this organization. To be honest, though, I had no idea that Water Rocks! has had such a big impact in the world of education until my internship this year. When I think about it, I realize that all the recognition and awards the program has received are definitely well deserved.

MeetTheInterns-NoahI remember the day in my freshmen year of high school when Mrs. T [DeAnna Tibben, Earth and Space Science teacher at Ames High] told my science class that we were going to spend the entire class period exploring the Water Rocks! website. I was completely surprised! To me, the website was just a bunch of pictures and videos of me with my friends and family doing things to help the environment, but not to the rest of the class. To them, the website was a river of new information about water quality, conservation, and fun. Yeah sure, I recall my peers joking around with me because they saw me in the videos and pictures, but I also recall them talking to each other and asking questions about water. That was a really cool thing to see the program that I was involved with be taught in my classroom and be widely accepted by high school students and teachers alike.

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Noah’s film debut in the Conservation Dogs music video (2012)!

Apart from my internship, my experience with Water Rocks! has been primarily through the music videos and songs produced by the program. With that said, my internship with Water Rocks! has shed a new light on how much educational material the organization actually has! Alongside dozens of informational videos and songs, Water Rocks! has loads of classroom modules, presentations, and games that inform about all things water. What is taught does a great job at not confusing the learner while at the same time informing effectively. The best part is that these materials do not just teach the information presented, they engage the learner and encourage them to participate in the learning; and it is fun!

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A few more recent music videos that Noah’s been a big part of: This Is Our Time (top) and Soil Health Style (bottom).

Besides all of the material Water Rocks! is able to teach people, something I really noticed about the program is how much, and far, the Water Rocks! team travels across the state to present the information. From county fairs to farmer’s markets, the team sent people all across the state throughout the whole summer presenting the Water Rocks! material. I was genuinely surprised at how many people were interested in what we had to say.

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In addition to video production, Noah got a taste of outreach this summer traveling to events across the state with the Conservation Station!  Here he is with college interns Kate Sanocki and Hannah Corey.

All in all, Water Rocks! is a great program full of information, engagement, and fun! It has been an interesting ride to see the full story behind what all goes on in this great organization in addition to the music.

-Noah Stevens

 

Wetlands Outreach: Tools of the Trade

To wrap up American Wetlands Month, we’d like to showcase some of the outstanding educational tools that the Iowa Learning Farms and Water Rocks! teams have developed to help teach about wetlands and the importance of these amazing ecosystems on our landscape!

Classroom Outreach
Much of our wetlands outreach with youth is done in the classroom. During a 40-45 minute classroom period, students get to explore the fascinating world of wetlands and the importance of these vibrant ecosystems and the biodiversity they support.

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We start out by going on an (audio) field trip, exploring the sounds of wetlands. Students close their eyes and are serenaded by leopard frogs, ducks, geese, and other bird sounds.  NO, it’s not the jungle or Amazon rainforest … we’ve traveled to the Wonderful World of Wetlands!

wetlands wordcloudNext students learn several of the different names by which wetlands are called. Some names are more familiar than others – swamp and marsh are very well known, while prairie pothole and fen are new to many students!  Slough (slew) is another fun one – weird spelling, but fun to say. We can’t forget mire and quagmire, as well.

wetlands are uniqueStudents then learn the three characteristics that make wetlands unique, as shown above. This is followed by exploring three very important jobs that wetlands do:

  1. Wetlands act like a Filter
  2. Wetlands act like a Sponge
  3. Wetlands act like a Home (Habitat)

After brainstorming many of the different creatures that would call wetlands their home, our focus narrows, zooming in on the birds and waterfowl. The following is an excerpt from a fall classroom experience with 5th graders:

WR! Staff: “It’s fall, and if we look up in the sky, what are the birds doing this time of year?”

Student:  “Oh!  They’re flying south!”

WR! Staff: “That’s right.  Can anyone tell us what that long journey is called?”

Student: “Migration!”

WR! Staff: “Excellent.  Now the birds’ migration is kind of like us going on a road trip or a vacation with our families.  So let’s imagine we’re going on a road trip…  the car is all packed… and we hit the road.   But eventually we’re going to need to stop.  What are some of the reasons we might need to stop on our journey?”

Students: “To get food.” “You’re thirsty – get something to drink.” “Go to the bathroom.”  (giggling) “Maybe stop and look at the scenery?”  “Get out and stretch.”

WR! Staff: “What if it’s a very long journey that might take several days?”

Students: “We’d need a hotel to rest!”

WR! Staff: “Well, there are a lot of similarities between our road trip and birds migrating twice a year. Birds need to stop for many of the same reasons we would. Thinking about what we’ve learned so far, where might birds stop on their journey?”

Students: “Maybe wetlands?

WR! Staff:  “Exactly!  Wetlands can provide all of those things we just talked about—food, water, shelter, a place to rest and recharge, a place to nest—wetlands are like a restaurant, gas station and hotel all in one!”

WR! Staff: “And when we go on a road trip, what is the name of the major road we travel on?”

Students: “Interstate or highway.”

WR! Staff: “That’s right, the highway.  And when birds migrate, they take the same path year after year, and they travel on the FLYWAY!”

Migration patterns

After engaging in an exchange like this, the students get to play Habitat Hopscotch. Students are invited to “summon their inner birds” and migrate from Canada to Mexico, with each hopscotch square representing wetlands in different states along the Mississippi River Flyway.

Each round of Habitat Hopscotch gets more challenging as wetlands (hopscotch squares) are removed due to different environmental scenarios such as draining for agricultural use, building a new shopping mall, climate change, etc. After the game’s completion, we lead a follow-up discussion with students to talk about what the loss of wetlands means to migrating birds based on their experience.

IMG_3491IMG_2520Students then get introduced to many of the other creatures that call wetlands home in a competitive game of Wetlands BINGO.  The hands-on approach and game show theme fosters a high level of engagement and curiosity throughout!

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Videos, Webinars, and Print Resources
Beyond classroom programs, our team offers an abundance of additional resources – videos, webinars, and print materials — to help people of all ages learn more about wetland ecosystems…

For elementary and middle school students, check out our super silly, super fun music video Wetlands Have Real Important Jobs to Do!

WetlandsHaveRealImportantJobsThe Conservation Dogs are all about wetlands, too! Check out Episode 4 and Episode 10 in the Adventures of the Conservation Pack series, where wetlands take center stage.

C-Pack-Charlie-WetlandsFor middle school and high school students, our new music video All About That Bog is a big hit!

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Our award-winning film Incredible Wetlands helps students and adults explore the biologically productive, and diverse, nature of wetlands and the vital role they play to life on Earth.

IncredibleWetlandsWetlands have also been featured several times in the Iowa Learning Farms webinar series. Check out these archived webinars to learn more:

Wetlands as Nutrient Sinks in Agricultural Landscapes, presented by Bill Crumpton
Iowa DNR’s Wetland Monitoring Program, presented by Jacklyn Gautsch

WetlandsImplementationAlso check out the Wetlands Implementation 4-page fact sheet in our “It Begins With You” series.

Thanks for joining us on this journey through American Wetlands Month!

Ann Staudt

ILF Partner Seth Watkins hosts 3rd Grade Field Trip

On Wednesday of this week, we had the pleasure of traveling down to our friend Seth Watkins’ farm in southwest Iowa to help out with a special field trip. A small group of 3rd grade students in the Corning schools, working with TAG Instructor and STEM Coordinator Tabatha Klopp, have been studying water quality, pollution, animal waste, nutrients, and more, and she was looking for field trip ideas to engage this great group of kids.

The Iowa Learning Farms program works with farmer-partners across the state, so we called upon Seth Watkins, near Clarinda, to help out and serve as host – a great opportunity for these 3rd grade students to see a wide variety of good conservation practices all in one place!  We brought the Conservation Station trailer down, as well, and had an awesome morning touring Seth’s farm, talking about water quality, and doing some water quality monitoring. Continue reading for the highlights!

The rain had been pretty relentless across southwest Iowa over the past week, so when the skies cleared on Wednesday morning, we immediately hopped on Seth’s hayrack for the farm tour first.  After the recent deluge of rain, one might be leery to be out driving through any field. But thanks to cover crops and perennial cover such as alfalfa, it was no problem at all!

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First we stopped to check out Seth’s grassed waterway. The students were in awe when Seth told us that the water moving down his grassed waterway eventually ends up at the Gulf of Mexico!  We worked together to trace the entire path of those raindrops, from Seth’s waterway, to the stream, to the 102 River near Bedford, to the Missouri River, to the Mississippi River, and ending up in the Gulf of Mexico. Before moving on, they collected water samples.

As the tour continued, we got to see several different types of cover crops, both living as well as recently terminated. We looked at the extensive roots of the cover crops and talked about how they make “tunnels” or pathways for water to move. As if on cue, an earthworm crawled out of the root bundle just as we were talking about soil structure!

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We also got to visit Seth’s pond; while we didn’t get to see the beavers that have taken up residency there, we did see other creatures like birds, frogs, and fish. Seth emphasized the importance of providing habitat for these creatures out on the landscape, whether it’s in a filter strip or around the pond, and how each one is an important part of our ecosystem.

Finally, Seth shared his golden rule of agronomy, which is if you take something from the land, you have to put something back – e.g. protecting the soil however we can, growing cover crops and perennials that put nutrients back in the soil, grazing livestock, etc.

Back at the shop, we gathered around the Conservation Station’s rainfall simulator, giving students the opportunity to see up close how different land management practices affect where water flows and how clean or dirty it is. The 3rd graders saw erosion happening right before their eyes and learned how long it takes new soil to form – 500 years for just 1 inch.

One of the students replied, “500 years?!  I wouldn’t even be alive!”

We wrapped up the morning by trying out some water quality monitoring. We tested different water samples for nitrate, pesticides, copper, iron, and transparency.  Several of the tests required dissolving a tablet and then shaking for 5 minutes, which quickly turned into a Taylor Swift dance party (Shake It Off!) …

To wrap things up, here are the 3rd grade students’ take home messages from the field tour and the Conservation Station trailer:

Water from here ends up in the ocean
Soil can get into water and make it dirty
Water can get polluted pretty fast
Don’t till the land
And you should plant cover crops!

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Thanks to Seth, Tabatha, and the Corning 3rd grade group for letting us spend part of the day with you. We had a great time!

Check out more photos on the Corning ELP & STEM Facebook page.

-Ann Staudt