Inspiration through Exploration

Today’s guest blog post comes from student intern Kaleb Baber, majoring in Agronomy and minoring in Geology at Iowa State University. Kaleb grew up on a family farm near Weston, MO, where he grew sweet corn, raised beef cattle, and was actively involved in FFA. We’re thrilled to have Kaleb back for a second summer in the Water Resources Internship Program!

For every classroom visit, the Water Rocks! team makes sure to leave time for students to ask us questions. On a visit near the beginning of my internship this summer, we had just finished presenting a lesson on watersheds when a student posed a question that caught me off guard. He asked, “What inspires you to do this?”

My coworkers and I all stared at each other like deer in headlights. It was a simple question, but one none of us had given much thought to. What did inspire me? Why did I care so much about water resources? Panic began to set in. I wanted to give a thoughtful answer to the student, but my mind was drawing a blank. With a room full of fifth graders starting up at me, I finally came up with something.

When I think about water, some of my favorite memories come to mind. I love being outdoors, so naturally I am outside whenever I have the chance. Growing up, it was a summer tradition for my family to go fishing in Ontario. I did not realize it at the time, but looking back now I realize that those family vacations when I was little helped shape my interests going forward.

Since those fishing trips, I have been fortunate enough to travel to some truly amazing places. In some places, like Yosemite Valley, the role of water in the landscape is obvious as waterfalls tumble over the towering walls of granite forged by massive glaciers. In other places, like the endless red sandstone of southern Utah, water is rarely seen. However, its effects have made a lasting impression by sculpting incredible rock formations through weathering and erosion.

From the secluded lakes of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to the powerful Colorado River that carved the Grand Canyon, water and its influences are all around us. Water is one of our most important natural resources, and I firmly believe that the best way to understand that is to go experience it firsthand. I am so grateful to have had these adventures, and I know for a fact that my passion for the outdoors began as a child on my family’s fishing trips to Ontario.

So to answer the student’s question, what inspires me to intern for Water Rocks! and Iowa Learning Farms is the memories I have made thanks to our water resources. Those memories inspire me to go outside and get up close and personal with nature. They inspire me to do my part in conserving our natural resources. And most of all, they inspire me to share the importance of clean, healthy water with others in hopes that they will make memories of their own.

Kaleb Baber

 

Deepening the Conversation around Conservation

Here at Water Rocks! we are always looking for new ways to reach the youth in Iowa, striving to deepen the conversation around conservation in new and exciting ways. Summer camp is an experience that provides youth a chance to connect to nature in a new way. When I was a camper and later a camp counselor, I saw first hand how camp changes interactions and respect for nature in a positive way. Water Rocks! day camps provide our team an opportunity to partner with extension youth coordinators, naturalists, and other environmental educators to offer the camp experience with a Water Rocks! twist!

We kicked things off with our first Water Rocks! day camp in March at the beautiful McFarland Park Nature Center. Students from Ames and the surrounding area arrived bright and early on March 8th and kicked off the day getting to know each other and getting acquainted with the concept of a watershed. We had students as young as 8 and as old as 12 join us. From the classroom we moved into nature to experience a watershed in real life. This is just one advantage to a full day camp: a way to turn the 2D into 3D.

Students designing their watershed!

Students did a great job transferring what they had learned to the landscape. They were able to determine where the water would flow at different points on the landscape. We were lucky to be surrounded by a small stream and a pond which gave them a visual of the bodies of water that the runoff could drain or shed to.

Jack and students walking the ridgeline between two small watersheds.

The highlight of the day was seeing the students work together on their service project. The Ames Smart Watersheds program donated a rain barrel for us to paint. It was on display at the Ames Eco-Fair on April 21st. Being able to participate in a real life solution to some of our watershed management concerns, such as flooding, helped to make our conversation about conservation relevant to their impact on the land.

At the end of the day the students had the opportunity to see if they could clean the water after it had been polluted. They got to choose what they polluted the water with and then were challenged with how to clean it up. Students noted how difficult it was to clean the water totally. Many filtered the water through several types of filters. We even set up a sand filter to mimic how nature filters our water as it moves through the soil profiles. The students recognized the importance of keeping our water clean to begin with, given how difficult the cleanup job was after the water had gotten dirty.

Students attempt to filter out the pollutants using coffee filters, panty hose, sand and other tools.

In all, students had a blast getting dirty and learning, too! Here at Water Rocks! we are looking forward to our next day camps coming up this summer, where we will get to partner with awesome county naturalists and educators with local Soil and Water Conservation Districts and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach!

Megan Koppenhafer

AmeriCorps Week: Doing My Part

Today’s guest blog post is provided by Jack Schilling, part of the Iowa AmeriCorps 4-H Outreach program, serving with Water Rocks! in 2017-2018.

This month, AmeriCorps Service Members participated in AmeriCorps Week, a week dedicated to raising awareness and promoting AmeriCorps. As a great opportunity to promote the program I have been a part of for six months, I immediately set my sights on my way of promotion: a radio interview in my hometown of Jefferson.

The local radio station, Raccoon Valley Radio, was kind enough to do an interview with me about AmeriCorps at my request. I spoke about AmeriCorps, Water Rocks!, and what I enjoyed about both. I even got the chance to talk about why I joined AmeriCorps: I needed more time to figure out what I wanted to do in life, and AmeriCorps seemed like a great use of time in my gap year.

As glad as I am to have done my part in promoting AmeriCorps, I wish I could have done more to promote the program for the week. I planned on giving a presentation to my county’s schools about AmeriCorps, but sadly their spring breaks were right over AmeriCorps Week! Nevertheless, I’m happy that I and the other AmeriCorps members were able to reach out and promote AmeriCorps to all who are looking for an opportunity just like this.

Jack Schilling

Studio Magic

Today’s guest blog post is provided by Megan Koppenhafer, part of the Iowa AmeriCorps 4-H Outreach program, serving with Water Rocks! in 2017-2018.

When I was young, I dreamed of being a singer. My friends and I would play “American Idol” for hours. As I became more interested in science I realized I wanted to teach people about science through music. This direction was largely inspired by Bill Nye the Science Guy; he had it all, it seemed, between the music and the education.

As I went through my school years I focused on science more and more. Finally, I decided to go to school for Environmental Science but I still wanted to be in that recording studio! Who knew after two college degrees, neither in music, I would end up getting to live a little bit of that childhood dream when I joined the Water Rocks! team as an AmeriCorps service member! In my position I help with Water Rocks! Assemblies and we use music to help teach science across the state of Iowa. We were in the process of developing the new pollinator-themed assembly when I got the opportunity to come out to the studio to record.

Me singing in the studio — trying to hit the right notes and keep tempo, oh my!

When you walk up to the small chicken coop studio in the middle of a cornfield you imagine it will be quaint and, well, Iowan. Junior’s Motel, the studio, is anything but. When you step through the door you are transported to an Elvis recording room type atmosphere.

Todd rocking out in the eclectic sound proof instrumental room. Note the “A Christmas Story” style lamp in the right corner.

There are moments of history covering the walls as you stare, face to face, at The Beatles and other rock group album covers. The legendary Kirk Kaufman, of Hawks: a rock group from the early 80s, runs the studio and records most of the songs for Water Rocks!. He says his inspiration for his studio came from recording sessions he did all over the country with his band.

I shook hands with Kirk and “fangirled” a bit about how cool the studio was and how exciting it was to finally meet the legend himself. Kirk is a conversational but quiet fellow who is definitely a music nerd to his core. Listening to him and Todd talk about old gigs and bass woes made me feel like I was a part of a band, which I guess I kind of am now!

Kirk at the soundboard marking which track would hold which part.

The recording process involves several steps. First, the instrumental tracks were laid. I listened intently, trying to get my part perfect before it was my turn to record. When it came time to lay the vocal tracks down, I was intrigued that we all had to be in separate spaces. Todd explained this was so each mic could be adjusted to pick up our voices in the best way possible. Rarely had I sung with such a short time between practice and performance, and I was definitely a little nervous.

Luckily, in the recording studio, you have an opportunity to fix mistakes. All of the different parts were recorded on different tracks so it would be easy to manipulate a mistake in one track while leaving the other good ones intact. The tracks are all recorded on a big role of tape which runs through a magnet while you are recording. The magnet arranges tiny metal particles as it goes, which is then output as music.

The recording tape on the left and the soundboard on the right with the tracks identified in dry erase marker.

After recording all three of our new songs, Todd made sure we had a vocal and an instrumental copy of each so that we could use them in our new Water Rocks! Pollinator Assembly. The process of creating music with a message I care very deeply about was an incredibly rewarding experience. Six year old Megan felt very much like an American Idol.

Be sure to follow us on Soundcloud to hear some of our new Pollinator Assembly songs. For more songs created in “Junior’s Motel” studio check out www.waterrocks.org and go to the Music Videos tab, or check out our YouTube channel WaterRocksISU to see full music videos as they are released.

Megan Koppenhafer

MLK Day: A Day of Service

Today’s guest blog post is provided by Jack Schilling, part of the Iowa AmeriCorps 4-H Outreach program, serving with Water Rocks! in 2017-2018.

When some people see Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on the calendar, they rejoice for the three-day weekend that is coming to them. For AmeriCorps members, this day is a chance to help the community through a Day of Service.

For my day of service, I participated in a t-shirt mat-making event at the Ames Des Moines City Church. The mats were made using strips of t-shirts braided together, and sewn in a circle. Since I’m not the most coordinated when sewing by hand, I took on the job of braiding the shirts together. It was certainly a learning experience for me, as my experience with braiding limited itself to watching my sister braid hair.

Thankfully, I picked up on the process fairly quickly and made my own tie. The whole process took two hours, which might be a testament to how slow I am at braiding! When the mats are finished, they will be sent to the Ames Animal Shelter, who will distribute them out to other animal shelters so they all have mats for animals to lay on instead of the cold cement.

There were many people at the event. I saw other AmeriCorps members from programs such as the Reading Corps, a branch of AmeriCorps that focuses on reading skills with students. Students from sororities, church members, and families came together to help create the mats. The sense of community, unity, and purpose were all there, and everyone in that room wanted to be there, and wanted to help on their day off, not because they had to, but because they wanted to.


All in all, I thought this event was a great idea, and I am excited to see the fruits of everyone’s labors really shine through when the animals in the shelters feel a bit more comfortable while waiting for a new home.

Jack Schilling

 

Water Rocks!: The Man

Today’s guest blog post is provided by Jack Schilling, part of the Iowa AmeriCorps 4-H Outreach program, serving with Water Rocks! in 2017-2018.

Another month has passed by, and with it another month of exciting adventures for me with Water Rocks! Assemblies, classroom visits, and lots of fun all along the way. But on top of these, there is one other thing that I have been working on throughout the past month: our new-old video series, Water Rocks! Man.

New-old. What do I mean by that? Water Rocks! Man originally aired on the Water Rocks! Facebook page in the spring and summer of 2016. Some were short music videos, and others were quick messages about conservation, with our superhero, Water Rocks! Man, featured in each video. Then, like all great superheroes, he retired from a life of heroism, and the series was retired with him.

Fast forward to the present day. Water Rocks! Man (Todd Stevens) has finally come back from retirement, and is ready to teach students about conservation once more. But now, Doctor Pollution (Nate Stevenson) has risen to try and spread pollution wherever he goes, and Water Rocks! Man, along with Agent Ag (Megan Koppenhafer), must stop him while educating about conservation practices.

Throughout the process of filming Water Rocks! Man, although the weather has occasionally not been kind to us (superhero and agent clothing is not warm!), everyone has enjoyed themselves and I’m excited to share the first few episodes soon. The project has certainly kept me busy, as I write, direct, film, and edit every episode. I really enjoy working on videos, especially editing, so it’s been a blast!

Keep an eye out for new Water Rocks! Man episodes throughout the next few months. I, along with the rest of the cast, hope you enjoy them!

Jack Schilling

 

Youth Outreach: Updates from Jack

Hi, again! If you read our blog last month, you may remember me as Jack Schilling, the new AmeriCorps service member serving with Water Rocks!. A lot has happened in this last month and a half, and I wanted to share what I have been up to throughout!

To start, I have done a lot of Water Rocks! school assemblies. At assemblies, we teach in front of a large group of students (usually hundreds of them) ranging from kindergarten all the way up to 8th grade. So far at assemblies, I have taught students about watersheds and soil conservation with games and music to help. I also help with behind-the-scenes work such as organizing our posters before we present, setting up the sound system, and scouting for the nearest bathroom.

Thanks to these assemblies, I’ve been able to continue to sing and act outside of school, even getting to play Mr. Raindrop in the assemblies. Having to learn all the songs, lines, and timing was daunting at first, but now that I’ve adjusted, things are going great!

Secondly, I have helped with quite a few Water Rocks! classroom visits. These interactive presentations are given to one class at a time, so it’s a more intimate setting with class sizes ranging from the teens to over thirty. These visits can take anywhere from a few hours to the whole day, but that is mainly dependent on how far across the state we travel. Some days, it could be a school in Des Moines, and other days it could be all the way up to Decorah.

The classroom presentations don’t have singing in them, but I get to help the students participate in fun games like We all Live in a Watershed, where students get to develop a piece of land to put in our watershed. It’s always funny to see the amount of McDonalds that are drawn! I have also taught modules on biodiversity, conservation, soil, and wetlands.

All in all, this last month and a half has been busy, especially with assemblies, but has been fun and engaging as well. In November, the assemblies will become less frequent, but classroom visits will pick up, meaning more time with a smaller, tight knit group of students. I look forward to the coming months ahead and am excited for more opportunities to teach about water and soil conservation.

Jack Schilling

Schilling is a part of the Iowa AmeriCorps 4-H Outreach program, serving with Water Rocks! in 2017-2018.