Conservation, Recreation, & Rhubarb Meet on the River

You were first introduced to our summer student interns in a blog post earlier this week (Meet our 2017 Water Resources Interns) – now it’s time to hear from them in first person!  Each student in our Water Resources Internship program will be blogging at some point over the course of the summer, so you can get a sneak peek into the many different projects they are involved with, from school visits, camps, and community outreach, to all kinds of field work related to soil health and water quality.

Our first student guest blog post comes from Kaleb Baber, who has just completed his first year of studies at Iowa State University, majoring in Agronomy. Kaleb grew up on a family farm near Weston, MO (north of Kansas City), where he grew sweet corn, raised beef cattle, and was actively involved in FFA. We’ll let Kaleb take it from here!

This past Saturday, June 3, I had the pleasure of traveling with the Conservation Station to Rhubarb on the River, an event held in Manchester, Iowa. This was the first community outreach event I have been to for Water Rocks!/Iowa Learning Farms. It was a fun-filled day of tasty rhubarb creations and great live music – all just a stone’s throw away from the beautiful Maquoketa River.

We left Ames around 6:30 in the morning, Conservation Station in tow (and coffee in hand). We arrived in Manchester around 9:00 and set up the Rainfall Simulator, Enviroscape, and Poo Toss game just in time for the event to start.

Families soon began to visit the Conservation Station. We spoke to over 180 people, ranging in age from babies to seniors. Children got a kick out of tossing (fake) dog poo and making it rain at the Enviroscape (what we call the Watershed Game), while their parents learned about land management practices, soil health and water quality at the Rainfall Simulator.

One conversation I had with a couple from Marion stood out in particular. They were interested in permeable pavers since it is a practice they could potentially implement on their patio. I told them about all of the benefits, such as improving infiltration, potentially reducing the impacts of flash floods and improving water quality. After that, they began asking about the agricultural practices represented by the other trays. The husband showed particular interest in cover crops. I explained the benefits of having the soil surface protected by the plant matter. The wife was curious about the role of nutrients and how they are lost from agricultural landscapes. I told her how the two main nutrients of concern, phosphorus and nitrogen, move through the environment and how cover crops are important since they have shown to reduce losses of both nutrients. The interest the couple had in the steps farmers are taking to improve Iowa’s soil and water quality was very exciting to me. It was great to be teaching the community about Iowa’s water resources, and it was an added bonus that we were right next to the river that flows through the heart of Manchester.

The city has recently built a series of rapids on the Maquoketa River. People were kayaking, floating, and swimming down the river. Children shrieked as their tubes tumbled over the whitewater. One girl who had played Poo Toss game earlier in the day even brought over a baby soft-shelled turtle she had found along the bank. Everyone along the river looked like they were having a blast, especially when it began to heat up in the afternoon!

Another highlight of the day was the delicious food the Manchester Chamber of Commerce was selling. I took a quick break to go grab a rhubarb bratwurst and a slice of rhubarb pie. Both were fantastic! Along Main Street, vendors were selling other rhubarb treats, such as ice cream and wine, as well as quilts and other handmade crafts.

Overall, Rhubarb on the River was an outstanding community event. The City of Manchester did an excellent job organizing it, and their hard work was rewarded by a beautiful day and a great turnout from the area residents. The interest that the public showed in making meaningful strides to cleaner water for the state of Iowa encouraged me, and I am excited to travel to more events like this throughout the rest of my time here as an intern.

Kaleb Baber

Meet Our 2017 Water Resources Interns!

We are happy to introduce a great crew of interns this year! You can catch our interns out this summer at county fairs, farmers markets, field days and festivals across the great state of Iowa as they travel with our fleet of Conservation Station trailers. Our interns will also play a large role in field work and data collection for research projects with Iowa State University Extension’s Iowa Learning Farms program and Iowa State’s Ag Water Management research group.

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Pictured above from left to right:

Elizabeth Schwab, hailing all the way from Levittown, Pennsylvania, is double majoring in Agronomy and Environmental Science at Iowa State. Elizabeth will begin her senior year this fall.

Chase Bethany, representing northeast Iowa, grew up in Chickasaw County in New Hampton. Chase is studying Agricultural Engineering (Power and Machinery Option) with a minor in business at Iowa State and will be a junior this fall.

Kaleb Baber represents the great state of Missouri. Kaleb grew up in Weston, Missouri, and headed north to pursue a degree in Agronomy at Iowa State. Kaleb will be a junior this fall.

Andrew Hillman hails from eastern Iowa and is a native of Bettendorf. Andrew is studying Biological Systems Engineering at Iowa State and will begin his junior year this fall.

Laura Lacquement, originally from Martensdale, Iowa, in Warren County, is studying Environmental Science and heading into her senior year this fall.

We are happy to have our interns on board! Come meet them at a community event near you. Keep your eyes peeled on the blog and on our program social media pages as our interns author guest blogs, talk about their experiences and share what they think is important about water quality, conservation and our natural resources.

Iowa Learning Farms: Follow Iowa Learning Farms on Facebook and Twitter!
Water Rocks!: Follow Water Rocks! on Facebook and Twitter!

Julie Whitson

Announcing the 2017 Water Resources Internship Program!

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We are looking for a great group of college interns that are passionate about conservation and natural resources, and eager to learn more about the many water and soil issues here in the state of Iowa. This competitive internship program is not just limited to ISU students – it’s open to undergraduate college students from any institution across the country.

Read on for full details of our 2017 Water Resources Summer Internship Program.  Applications are being accepted through this Thursday, January 26, at 5:00pm! Perhaps you know a college student who might be interested. Please pass this information along to them!

2017 Water Resources Summer Internship Program

Position Description:
Have an interest in the environment, conservation, and agriculture, particularly water and soil quality? We are seeking undergraduate student interns for summer 2017 who are self-motivated, detail-oriented, strong communicators, enthusiastic, and have a sense of fun!
Interns’ time will be split between research and outreach, all centered around environmental issues and challenges in Iowa. Summer interns will have the opportunity to:

• Work with two exciting Iowa State University education and outreach programs:
Water Rocks!, focused on youth outreach, and
Iowa Learning Farms, focused on adult/community outreach
• Help children and adults better understand environmental and agricultural issues
• Travel throughout the state of Iowa with the fleet of three Conservation Station trailers
• Develop strong oral communication skills
• Contribute to water and soil quality research projects in ISU’s top-ranked Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
• Gain technical skills related to environmental science, soil and water quality through both field and lab research

The program is based on campus at Iowa State University and will involve travel to research sites and various outreach events around the state, which includes some scheduled night and weekend events. This is a paid internship, with students working up to 40 hours/week. The internship program begins Wednesday, May 10 and runs through Friday, July 28, 2017.

The Iowa State University water resources internship program serves as an outstanding springboard for careers in agriculture, engineering, the environment, and/or further studies. Past participants in our internship program have gone on to such careers as project engineer, watershed coordinator, environmental educator, field research specialist, and USDA-FSA program technician, while others have pursued graduate school opportunities.

Job Skills and Requirements:
• Currently enrolled undergraduate student (open to all majors)
• Demonstrated interest and/or background in environmental science, natural resources, conservation, soil and water quality, agriculture, and/or education
• Evidence of strong communication skills
• Ability to learn new tasks quickly
• Teamwork skills
• Self-motivated
• Detail-oriented
• Time management skills

Additional internship requirements:
• Participation in 5-week spring training course for internship (one night per week, beginning week of March 27)
• Possession of valid driver’s license
• Background check with ISU Risk Management for working with youth

How to Apply:
Required application materials include:
• Resume (Include your GPA, major, related coursework, and previous work experience)
• Cover Letter (Tell us what interests you about this internship and why you’d be a great fit!)

Internship application deadline is 5:00pm on Thursday, January 26, 2017. Please submit your complete application package to Ann Staudt via email – astaudt@iastate.edu. We will conduct interviews with qualified students in early February.

Ann Staudt

 

Reflections on Water Rocks! over the years

This is our our final intern guest blog post for the summer! Noah Stevens is entering his senior year at Ames High School, where he is actively involved in track, cross country, and the performing arts. He has helped out with numerous Water Rocks! video productions over the years, and this summer participated in our high school internship program.

I’ve been involved with the Water Rocks! program since its origin back in 2012, and I must say, it has been fun to watch it progress in its success. From watching myself in the first Water Rocks! music video on the Water Rocks! website to being present at the Capitol building when the program was awarded with the Iowa Environmental Excellence Award for the State of Iowa, I have felt very privileged to be a part of this organization. To be honest, though, I had no idea that Water Rocks! has had such a big impact in the world of education until my internship this year. When I think about it, I realize that all the recognition and awards the program has received are definitely well deserved.

MeetTheInterns-NoahI remember the day in my freshmen year of high school when Mrs. T [DeAnna Tibben, Earth and Space Science teacher at Ames High] told my science class that we were going to spend the entire class period exploring the Water Rocks! website. I was completely surprised! To me, the website was just a bunch of pictures and videos of me with my friends and family doing things to help the environment, but not to the rest of the class. To them, the website was a river of new information about water quality, conservation, and fun. Yeah sure, I recall my peers joking around with me because they saw me in the videos and pictures, but I also recall them talking to each other and asking questions about water. That was a really cool thing to see the program that I was involved with be taught in my classroom and be widely accepted by high school students and teachers alike.

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Noah’s film debut in the Conservation Dogs music video (2012)!

Apart from my internship, my experience with Water Rocks! has been primarily through the music videos and songs produced by the program. With that said, my internship with Water Rocks! has shed a new light on how much educational material the organization actually has! Alongside dozens of informational videos and songs, Water Rocks! has loads of classroom modules, presentations, and games that inform about all things water. What is taught does a great job at not confusing the learner while at the same time informing effectively. The best part is that these materials do not just teach the information presented, they engage the learner and encourage them to participate in the learning; and it is fun!

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A few more recent music videos that Noah’s been a big part of: This Is Our Time (top) and Soil Health Style (bottom).

Besides all of the material Water Rocks! is able to teach people, something I really noticed about the program is how much, and far, the Water Rocks! team travels across the state to present the information. From county fairs to farmer’s markets, the team sent people all across the state throughout the whole summer presenting the Water Rocks! material. I was genuinely surprised at how many people were interested in what we had to say.

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In addition to video production, Noah got a taste of outreach this summer traveling to events across the state with the Conservation Station!  Here he is with college interns Kate Sanocki and Hannah Corey.

All in all, Water Rocks! is a great program full of information, engagement, and fun! It has been an interesting ride to see the full story behind what all goes on in this great organization in addition to the music.

-Noah Stevens

 

Research Rocks!

Hi! I am Emily Rehmann, and I am one of the high school interns for Water Rocks! and Iowa Learning Farms this year. I will be a freshman at Washington University in St. Louis next year, and I am excited to start a new adventure there.

MeetTheInterns-EmilyThis is my second year interning with Water Rocks!, and while I enjoyed a second season of counting middens and attending fairs with the Conservation Station, I also wanted to try something new: data analysis. I had already experienced collecting water samples in the field from lysimeters, and now I wanted to take it further and see the results of the project and finally the implications of the results and the effects that they could have.

In the most recent blog post, Getting Dirty and Getting Samples, Mary described how the water samples from lysimeters are collected. Where she left off, Jessica, another high school intern and my sister, and I come in.

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The Rehmann sisters out and about with the Conservation Station — Emily is on the left and Jessica (who blogged earlier this summer) is on the right!

We have been working on analyzing the lysimeter project data from 2014 and 2015. Lysimeters collect groundwater samples, which are sent to the lab and analyzed for nitrate. The Iowa Learning Farms team is comparing the amount of nitrate in the subsurface water for corn vs. soybeans, and single cover crop vs. a cover crop mixture vs. no cover crop.

There are five sites where the Iowa Learning Farms team has collected water quality data for three years now: ISU Research Farms at Lewis, McNay, Crawfordsville, Kanawha, and Nashua. Each site has 24 plots (and thus 24 lysimeters), with 12 plots each for corn and soybeans. Within each cropping system, there are three treatments: plots with no cover crops, plots with a single cover crop (oats before corn; rye before soybeans), and plots with a cover crop mixture (oats, hairy vetch, and radish before corn; and rye, rapeseed, and radish before soybeans).

 Data are collected about eleven times per year from each lysimeter (from approximately April through November, as the weather allows). This all adds up to a lot of data to analyze–almost 800 samples per year!

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We had ten of these big spreadsheets, plus summary sheets, by the end of the process!

Jessica and I compared the lysimeter results from one plot with itself throughout the year, from one plot with a certain treatment to other plots with the same treatment, as well as comparisons between treatments. We also looked at precipitation data and the volumetric water content at 12 and 24 inches deep in the soil, measured at each site (from Iowa State Agclimate Automated Weather stations). We lined up the data from the lysimeters with the precipitation and volumetric water content data at each site to look for patterns and correlations.

Analyzing data was a fun and challenging experience. It was fun to figure out how what would be interesting to look at and compare, and how to best present the data. As we worked through the data, we kept coming up with more ideas for what to do with it and what graphs to make.

Our preliminary results indicate a positive water quality benefit comes from using a cereal rye cover crop ahead of soybeans. Cover crop mixtures can also help, but so far, across multiple sites, we have found that having a single species cover crop of rye ahead of soybeans is the most effective treatment for having a low amount of nitrates leaving the field. Preliminary results from Kanawha are shown below as an example. Since I do not know what a statistical difference between measurements would be, I cannot claim any definite results of the data yet.

Kanawha Preliminary ResultsThe water quality trends were less clear with corn. While a single species cover crop (oats) is also the most effective for corn, it is far less effective than rye is for soybeans. The cover crops used ahead of corn (oats, hairy vetch, and radish) all either die off over the winter OR yield very little spring growth. The biggest difference in the soybeans was the use of cereal rye and its winter hardiness — the spring cover crop growth made a huge difference in terms of water quality benefits! As the rye on the soybean plots has more to time grow in the spring, it uptakes more nitrate. Corn is planted earlier in the season, so if rye were growing prior to corn, it would have to be terminated earlier, yielding less benefit for the nitrate uptake by the cover crop.

Ideally, the amount of nitrate leaving the field (represented by the water that a lysimeter collects) would be low. Nitrate is most useful on the farm field, as it is dangerous in high concentrations to humans and pollutes water. Depending on the final results of the data, this research could potentially be used to show how and which type of cover crops are most effective in holding the nitrate in place without letting it move into water sources.

IowaNutrientReductionStrategyThis research and its results are important for water quality across the state of Iowa. The Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy aims to reduce nutrients in water coming from point sources, like wastewater treatment plants, and nonpoint sources, like farms. A high concentration of nutrients can cause hypoxia, a condition of an area of water that cannot support marine life because it does not have enough oxygen. Hypoxia is a problem in the Gulf of Mexico, and currently the states along the Mississippi River have (or are working to develop) nutrient reduction strategies to help solve this.

This research is made more relevant with the current lawsuit between Des Moines Water Works and three Iowa counties. The Des Moines Water Works uses the Raccoon River for their half million consumers, and they want the amount of nitrates coming from farms in the counties to decrease.

Farmers can make a huge impact on the amount of nitrate in water. I attended a meeting of the Ames City Council in the spring, and the Water and Pollution Control Administration presented to the Council. They could put $36 million into reducing nitrate leaving their facility, but there would be little overall effect. Since farms contribute 92% of the nitrogen load, while municipalities only contribute 8%, we need to consider how much focus there is on reducing the contribution from the point source pollution sources in the municipalities as well as on farms. The research that we are doing will hopefully help show farmers that cover crops are a great way to reduce the amount of nitrate leaving their fields, while also helping to build soil health and protect our soil from erosion.

Overall this internship has been very influential in what I am interested in. I am undecided on what I would like to major in at WashU, but I know that I would like to continue studying science and the environment, including taking a class on environmental science. I care about protecting the water, soil, and climate, and this internship has helped me to realize that.

Emily Rehmann

Getting Dirty and Getting Samples

My name is Mary and I am a high school intern with Water Rocks! this summer. I have always been interested in natural resources, and I will be pursuing a degree in Natural Resources and Environment Science with a concentration on Resource Conservation and Restoration Ecology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign this fall.

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I have had so many great opportunities and experiences with Water Rocks! this summer. I have been able to participate in multiple outreach events at county fairs and farmers markets across Iowa.  I have also had the opportunity to attend a farmer field day discussing everything anyone would want to know about cover crops.

Mary-ConservationStationMost recently I was able to go up to Nashua and collect water samples from lysimeters at the Northeast Research Farm. Our lysimeters are buried 24” deep and collect water from the surrounding soil.  The water samples are then tested to see the nitrate levels in the water at different times during the year and under different cover crop treatments. This research is very important in helping us better understand cover crops – they are one of the key practices in the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy, where the goal is to try and reduce the nitrogen and phosphorus loads in Iowa waters by 45%.

The plots from which we collected water samples were each 6 rows wide – and we have plots that are in both corn and soybeans (rotated every other year). The entrance to the research farm is a couple of buildings, and then it moves straight into the research plots.  We had to drive a little ways to reach our lysimeter plots. There are many other research plots around our lysimeter plots. All of our fields were no till fields – some of them had cover crops in the spring (single species/mixtures) and some did not. We started collecting samples from the soybeans first, and then moved to the corn.

Lysimeters-InGroundCollecting water samples is quite simple, but finding the lysimeters when the crops are large isn’t always a piece of cake!  The lysimeters are buried underground, so all we can see is the PVC cap protecting it … and sometimes they get covered with soil or are hidden by residue.

Lysimeters-SuppliesOnce we have found the lysimeters, we grabbed our equipment which included a plastic beaker with a rubber stopper on top and a long thin tube attached, an air pump, plastic bottles to pour collected samples into, and a clipboard with labels to mark the samples.

Lysimeters-SamplingInProgressWe collected the sample by inserting the thin tube down into the lysimeter, attaching the beaker to the air pump, and applying vacuum to the lysimeter so the water would be sucked out.  After the sample was collected, we would have to apply vaccum to the lysimeter again (60 psi) so it could collect the next batch of samples.

Collecting clean samples is a key component.  If there was soil in the water sample, how would we know that the nitrates in the water weren’t from the soil?  I was out collecting samples the day after a big rainstorm, and of course it was really muddy out, so we had to be extra careful to keep the soil and mud off of the equipment used to collect the samples.  If we collected a dirty sample, then it would have to be filtered in the lab before the nitrate test could be done accurately.  Also, after every sample is collected, the plastic collection beaker must be rinsed out with DI Water (deionized water), so the next sample wouldn’t be contaminated by the previous sample.

Seeing the lysimeters and collecting water samples was very educational for me, and I was glad that I had an opportunity to see what research is being done and how it is done.  I learned how thorough you have to be when conducting research – there can be lots of variables in the field so quality control is really important.  I was also surprised by how dirty I was on the way home after collecting all of the samples!

So now we’ve collected water samples… next they go to the lab for nitrate testing. After that, there are lots of water quality data to analyze. Stay tuned to the blog as Emily, another high school intern, will tell us more about that process!

Mary-ShowingPigsBooneCoAs a fun side note, I wanted to share another one of my projects for this summer. In addition to this internship, I am a member of the Gilbert FFA Chapter and I recently showed pigs at the Boone County Fair (I’m number 344 in the blue shirt). That pig in the picture will be making an appearance at the Iowa State Fair – the show is on August 12th if you’d like to stop by and watch after you visit Farm Bureau Park and check out the Conservation Station!

Mary Marsh

 

Second Year Perspectives: Back for Round II

NOTE: You’ve been meeting our great group of college interns through their guest blog posts these past couple weeks, but it’s time now that we show some love to our outstanding high school interns, as well!  Kicking things off is Jessica Rehmann, a 2016 Ames High School graduate who is back for her second year in the high school water resources internship program.

My name is Jessica Rehmann, and I have come back to intern with Water Rocks! and Iowa Learning Farms for a second year. I just graduated from Ames High School, and I will be a freshman at Washington University in St. Louis in the fall.

MeetTheInterns-JessicaLast year, I enjoyed my experience with the internship, and I appreciated the variety of tasks, including field research and outreach. I learned a lot about conservation practices and farming methods, and I saw them in use when I worked in the fields collecting data for research. At outreach events, I learned how to effectively communicate field research results and conservation practices to the public.

Soybeans flowering in the field, June 2016

Soybeans flowering in the field, June 2016

Because I have grown up in a suburban environment, I had little prior knowledge of anything related to farming before the internship. Now I can have educated discussions on conservation practices. I decided to do the internship again this year because I wanted to continue working on research projects from last year, doing more outreach with the community, and learning more about conservation and sustainable farming practices.

As I did last year, I have counted earthworm middens in the fields. This year the counting was easier and faster because I knew better what I was looking for in each plot!

Counting earthworm middens in cover crop strips at the ISU Boyd Farm earlier in June.

Counting earthworm middens in cover crop strips at the ISU Boyd Farm earlier in June.

I have also collected water samples from lysimeters in the field. The last time I went, the field had just had a large rainfall, so the lysimeters were very full. I am excited to learn how to analyze data from the lysimeters.

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Tools of the trade for collecting water samples from the suction lysimeters.

 

The internship has also involved two of the extracurricular activities I enjoy the most: music and art. Last year, one of my favorite parts of the internship was getting to play saxophone in the recording studio for two of the tracks on the new children’s music CD Trees, Bees, and More Nature Songs for Water Rocks! I liked the opportunity to tie my work and music together. I also saw how an analog recording studio works, which was a neat experience.

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Recording at Junior’s Motel Recording Studio, near Otho, last year.

This year, I have a new creative side to the internship: I am helping to redesign the website for the Conservation Pack and helping to write an interactive “Letters to the Conservation Pack” activity for kids.

I am also excited for the fair season to reach full swing! My first event was recently working in the Keosauqua Farmers Market, and in the upcoming weeks, I will attend more county fairs.

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Leading the hands-on Enviroscape activity (aka Watershed Game) at the Dallas Co. Fair last summer (TOP) and the Keosauqua Farmers Market this year (BOTTOM).

My experiences with this internship and my love of hiking and the outdoors have made me want to study environmental science in college. In the fall I will be taking a class on Missouri’s natural heritage, which will cover environmental science and more. Because sustainable practices are important and relevant–especially in the Midwest–I am interested in their technical foundations and the social and political aspects of implementing them. I am excited to see where the rest of the internship this summer will take me!

Jessica Rehmann